WTB 1969 Single Six .22 Magnum cylinder

Discussion in 'Wanted' started by daveag, May 2, 2016.

  1. daveag

    daveag New Member

    27
    0
    0
    I'm looking for a .22 Mag cylinder for a 3-screw OM 1969 vintage Thanks!
     
  2. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

    2,733
    9
    38
    You know that the cylinder has to be 'timed' for the gun, right?
     

  3. daveag

    daveag New Member

    27
    0
    0
    I've read where it's a Ruger job have to send it in. what exactly happens when you "time" a revolver? slide a gage down barrel to cylinder? I'd like to know procedure. Price of .22 Mag is enough to forget it. I shot a NM Single Six this week I put golf balls on clay birds. Years ago I had a .22 Mag rifle, Mossberg or some bolt action very, accurate but the price then, 1980, made me trade it
     
  4. Pancho_Villa

    Pancho_Villa Active Member

    1,176
    17
    38
    In most cases, Single actions only. If the cylinder will drpp into the frame without forcing it, Ya can try locking the cylinder pin. Without forcing it of course. Places where it could drag would be between the barrel and front of the cylinder, the font of he cylinder may be too tight to aloow it to slide into the frame also. Those would be the first things to look at. Enough cylinder end play and enough barrel to cylinder clearance. That would require polishing of the front end of the cylinder to clear the frame if it does not go in. same for the back end of the barrel if there is any contact/drag marks there.

    Now if ya got enough "play" at those 2 locations. You may be able to seat teh pin if the cylinder goes all the way in. If not, you may have to trim some off the rim around the cylinder ratchet. Not a good thing and hard to go without screwing up the chambers. and or the ratchet. Let's say ya got lucky and it dropped in right or ya fitted it so far.

    Next thing is to make sure the hand rotating the cylinder does not drag and that the bolt locking the cylinder at the bottom drops out of it's notch at ehe right TIME. If the hand and ratchet look like they work, the bolt/cylinder lock has to drop out of it's notch before the ratchet and had strart turning the cylinder. If the bolt does not drop before the cylinder starts to turn, the cylinder will lock up. You may be able to push the bolt down to clear the cylinder stip notches while working the hand and ratchet with the hammer. and releasing the trigger caretully. That will give you a chance to check if there is any drag between the hand and ratchet on the cylinder. You can usualy trim a bit off the leading edge of the bolt stop with a dremel tool Very carefully to get it to clear the cylinder stop notch a bit quicker. Once it clears, drag marks will show. How much ya trim will decrease the cylinder drag marks. However, if ya cut toomuch off the bolt stop, the cylinder will override it or skip it. Ya gotta check that it works on both cylinder too cause it might work on one o.k. and skip on the other.

    That was assuming the cylinder ratchet and hand worked correctly in the first place and did not drag due to any misalignment. Now that 's a real BEEEEtch to fug wid if it does not.

    Then if all that is right, ya have to check for any barrel sylinder misaliignment. If the cylinder locks up, it is in theory also aligned properly with the barrel. Not always the case. I had one Service six that cut enough lead from the factory that it would shoot 3" to one side. Ihad to open up the forcing cone on the side where it was cutting lead with a dremel tool. I put some more angle on the forcing cone on one side. The bullets did not grag as mcuh and get idstorted. Results were that groups shrunk by 5 invhrd s inches and right to the POA at 20 yards. I usually run a rod about half the size of the bore along the sides to check if there are any places where the rod makes contat with the cylinder face. If there is contact, make a note of it and mark the OTHER side of the forcing cone. Bullet drags will be there.

    Anyway, in some cases, I heard the cylinders just drop in and work. Most of the work I did was with old revolvers I picked up at gunshows. Not Rugers. Most were the old German six shooters. The old worn out Colt Police Postives and Official Police were all over the gunshows in bad time in years past. I could usually pick them up cheap and find parts to retime them. Those are even harder than the single actions.

    Does that help any? Oh, I also need a magmum cylinder for a "Liberty Model" single six. Been looking at the shows. Haven't found one. I bought if off some idiot that lost the original. But like ya said, the magnums are expensive. But I do want the cylinder. I just don't want to pay the factory to fit one.
     
  5. Skeet

    Skeet New Member

    5
    0
    0
    I have fit a cylinder or two over the years. Not long alo I bought a Colt 22 LR cylinder at a gun show and voila.. it fit perfectly. But I got a 357 cylinder for a NM BlackHawk a fellow gave me. I had the 9mm cylinder and I had to find one, It cost 70 bucks and it took an hour or a little bit more to fit it. I was lucky. I have a stainless NM 22 Mag cylinder here just in case I buy a Single six without the extra cylinder. Having a bunch or 22 mag shot cartridges here It would make a nice snake gun. Despise rattlesnakes round the house
     
  6. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    0
    0
  7. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    0
    0
    Poncho Villa did very well explaining it.

    A lot of times just a replacement pawl will solve the problem.

    However on discontinued guns, those are not easy to come by.

    And if you get a used cylinder like you are looking for, you can bet a replacement pawl would not fit anyways.

    I do not know what your level of experience with any smithing work is.

    Brownells sells an over size pawl for $60-65 that you file to fit the ratchets on the cylinder.

    The other things you have to consider is things like endshake and stuff like that that shims can be made for.

    I am certainly not trying to talk you out of this project, but you could be looking at quite a layout of money.

    $80-100 for the cylinder, $60-65 for the pawl, $10-15 for endshake shims if needed, and could be about $100 for smith labor if you need to go that way.

    Anyways, good luck. That really is a fine old gun.

    Doc
     
  8. jpsbgt

    jpsbgt New Member

    8
    4
    3
    FYI , I bought a OMSS few years ago at a pawn shop in Idaho. Gun was on consignment, came with two cylinders. When I got it home I discovered I got two 22 lR mags ! No magnum cylinders. Fast forward, found a mag cylinder in my area, dropped right in a works perfect.
     

    Attached Files: