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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a Google search but I need broken down ..simplified.

Muzzle energy... Ex.. 640 ftlbs The amount of weight it could move at the muzzle? Is that considered momentum?

What is the Taylor KO Index?

Like you're talking to a three year old. Lol
Thank you
 

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The foot ( feet ) per second (symbolized ft/s or ft/sec) is the unit of linear speed in the foot-pound-second ( fps ) or English system.

This quantity can be defined in either of two senses: average or instantaneous.


Average linear speed is obtained by measuring the distance in feet that an object travels in a certain number of seconds, and then dividing the distance by the time. If s avg represents the average speed of an object (in feet per second) during a time interval t (in seconds), and the distance traveled in that time is equal to d (in feet), then:

s avg = d / t


Instantaneous linear speed is more difficult to intuit, because it involves an expression of motion over an "infinitely short" interval of time. Let p represent a specific point in time. Suppose an object is in motion at about that time. The average speed can be measured over increasingly short time intervals centered at p , for example:

[ p -4, p +4]
[ p -3, p +3]
[ p -2 , p +2]
[ p -1, p +1]
[ p -0.5, p +0.5]
[ p -0.25, p +0.25]
.
.
.
[ p - x , p + x ]
.
.
.
.
...where the added and subtracted numbers represent seconds. The instantaneous speed, s inst , is the limit of the measured average speed as x approaches zero. This is a theoretical value, because it cannot be obtained except by inference from measurements made over progressively shorter time spans.


It is important to realize that speed is not the same thing as velocity. Speed is a scalar (dimensionless) quantity, while velocity is a vector quantity consisting of speed and direction.

We might say a car is traveling at 60 ft/s, and this tells us its speed. Or we might say the car is traveling at 60 ft/s at a compass bearing of 25 degrees (north-by-northeast); this tells us its velocity. As with speed, we might specify either the average velocity over a period of time, or the instantaneous velocity at an exact moment in time.

The foot per second is often used by lay people when talking about speed, particularly in the United States. But scientists, and most people in other parts of the world, use the meter per second (m/s), which is the standard unit of speed in the International System of Units ( SI ).



foot-pound. (NOUN)

1.a unit of energy equal to the amount required to raise 1 pound a distance of 1 foot.

2.a unit of torque equal to the force of 1 lbs acting perpendicularly to an axis of rotation at a distance of 1 foot.

3.The foot-pound is often used to specify the muzzle energy of a bullet in small arms ballistics, particularly in the United States

The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf) is a unit of work or energy in the Engineering and Gravitational Systems in United States customary and imperial units of measure. It is the energy transferred upon applying a force of one pound-force (lbf) through a linear displacement of one foot. The corresponding SI unit is the joule.

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Off the top of my head...:rolleyes:
 

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The foot ( feet ) per second (symbolized ft/s or ft/sec) is the unit of linear speed in the foot-pound-second ( fps ) or English system.

This quantity can be defined in either of two senses: average or instantaneous.


Average linear speed is obtained by measuring the distance in feet that an object travels in a certain number of seconds, and then dividing the distance by the time. If s avg represents the average speed of an object (in feet per second) during a time interval t (in seconds), and the distance traveled in that time is equal to d (in feet), then:

s avg = d / t


Instantaneous linear speed is more difficult to intuit, because it involves an expression of motion over an "infinitely short" interval of time. Let p represent a specific point in time. Suppose an object is in motion at about that time. The average speed can be measured over increasingly short time intervals centered at p , for example:

[ p -4, p +4]
[ p -3, p +3]
[ p -2 , p +2]
[ p -1, p +1]
[ p -0.5, p +0.5]
[ p -0.25, p +0.25]
.
.
.
[ p - x , p + x ]
.
.
.
.
...where the added and subtracted numbers represent seconds. The instantaneous speed, s inst , is the limit of the measured average speed as x approaches zero. This is a theoretical value, because it cannot be obtained except by inference from measurements made over progressively shorter time spans.


It is important to realize that speed is not the same thing as velocity. Speed is a scalar (dimensionless) quantity, while velocity is a vector quantity consisting of speed and direction.

We might say a car is traveling at 60 ft/s, and this tells us its speed. Or we might say the car is traveling at 60 ft/s at a compass bearing of 25 degrees (north-by-northeast); this tells us its velocity. As with speed, we might specify either the average velocity over a period of time, or the instantaneous velocity at an exact moment in time.

The foot per second is often used by lay people when talking about speed, particularly in the United States. But scientists, and most people in other parts of the world, use the meter per second (m/s), which is the standard unit of speed in the International System of Units ( SI ).



foot-pound. (NOUN)

1.a unit of energy equal to the amount required to raise 1 pound a distance of 1 foot.

2.a unit of torque equal to the force of 1 lbs acting perpendicularly to an axis of rotation at a distance of 1 foot.

3.The foot-pound is often used to specify the muzzle energy of a bullet in small arms ballistics, particularly in the United States

The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf) is a unit of work or energy in the Engineering and Gravitational Systems in United States customary and imperial units of measure. It is the energy transferred upon applying a force of one pound-force (lbf) through a linear displacement of one foot. The corresponding SI unit is the joule.

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Off the top of my head...:rolleyes:
Uh,what??? You lost me on part of that don't know about him....and I thought I already knew it :confused: ,course,I didn't really get into scientific stuff in school either ;) .
 

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RETIRED MODERATOR
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The Taylor KO Factor is an mathematical formula approach for evaluating the stopping power of hunting cartridges.

The term "KO" is an acronym for "Knock Out."

The Taylor KO Factor (TKOF) is a derived figure that allows hunters to compare bullets with respect to stopping power. The TKOF was developed by John Taylor, a famous mid-20th century hunter and poacher of African big game.

{ I would give you the equation...but I don't want Jerry's head to blow up...!! }

---------------------------------

Put your helmet on Jerry...

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-In 5...4...3...2...1
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Example Calculation

Consider the case of a standard .308 (7.62×51mm NATO) cartridge.

It has the following characteristics:

Diameter: 7.62 mm ⇒ 0.30 inches
Mass: 9.7 grams ⇒ 150 grain bullet
Velocity: 860 meters per second ⇒ 2820 feet per second

The calculation is performed as shown:

TKOF = 0.30 x 150 x 2820 /(over) 7000 = 18.1
 

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Jeez, Jerry,

I learned in high school algebra class to let those formulae sort of float on the top of my mind. If anything wanted to sink in, OK; but trying to push the stuff down created an equal and opposite resistance + nosebleed.
 

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Jeez, Jerry,

I learned in high school algebra class to let those formulae sort of float on the top of my mind. If anything wanted to sink in, OK; but trying to push the stuff down created an equal and opposite resistance + nosebleed.
We had a lot of equations in algebra too,I even took college algebra but the letters we used didn't represent anything that I can remember,course that was many moons ago and I've slept since then. :D The only 1 I remember actually meaning something was Pi. ;)
 

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Jeez, Jerry,

I learned in high school algebra class to let those formulae sort of float on the top of my mind. If anything wanted to sink in, OK; but trying to push the stuff down created an equal and opposite resistance + nosebleed.

I had a similar relationship with algebra.......
Always disliked it.....
 

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Tommycourt
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Quote from Shooter,Algebra...it's NOT for everyone !
Algebra...it's NOT for everyone
!

I could not understand algebra even though I had 2 years of it however when it came to geometry it made sense to me. It was something I could see and use in my "minds eye" and when I was selling heavy construction equipment, it would come to me. I knew just enough algebra to gain my understanding of geometry. This was really critical when it came to conveyors and stock piles of crushed rock or and etc.

Tommy
 

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Algebra...it's NOT for everyone !!

There WILL be a pop quiz Jerry...so study !!
That'll be hard to do since I just "rented" the books ;). They're probably long destroyed by now :D. If the "new algebra" is anything like the "new math" I'd need to go to college for a refresher course :duck::cryinglaugh:
 

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The Taylor KO Factor is an mathematical formula approach for evaluating the stopping power of hunting cartridges.



The term "KO" is an acronym for "Knock Out."



The Taylor KO Factor (TKOF) is a derived figure that allows hunters to compare bullets with respect to stopping power. The TKOF was developed by John Taylor, a famous mid-20th century hunter and poacher of African big game.



{ I would give you the equation...but I don't want Jerry's head to blow up...!! }



---------------------------------



Put your helmet on Jerry...



----------------------------------

-

-

-In 5...4...3...2...1

-

-

-



Example Calculation



Consider the case of a standard .308 (7.62×51mm NATO) cartridge.



It has the following characteristics:



Diameter: 7.62 mm ⇒ 0.30 inches

Mass: 9.7 grams ⇒ 150 grain bullet

Velocity: 860 meters per second ⇒ 2820 feet per second



The calculation is performed as shown:



TKOF = 0.30 x 150 x 2820 /(over) 7000 = 18.1

Or, you can use the metric units, and divide by 3500.
 

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Tommycourt
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2,139 Posts
I was lost after the 5-4-3-2-1-. :dunno::hammer::headscratch:

Tommy

P.S. Shooter and Savage are in the wrong business. They both need to be in NASA with their abilities!!!!
 

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I was lost after the 5-4-3-2-1-. :dunno::hammer::headscratch:

Tommy

P.S. Shooter and Savage are in the wrong business. They both need to be in NASA with their abilities!!!!
Trump is planning to smallify NASA, I have read. He ain't interested in what's out there beyond the atmosphere. Or about what's in the atmosphere either.
 

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P.S. Shooter and Savage are in the wrong business. They both need to be in NASA with their abilities!!!!

Well, if NASA does any if this stuff that Shooter is doing, I'd be very, very lost and confused :dizzy: :cheesy:
 

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Energy = KINETIC energy = (1/2) x (mass) x (velocity squared)
or, KE = (0.5) x (m) x (v^2)
momentum = power factor = (mass) x (velocity)
Tyler KO = ((mass of bullet in grains) x ("velocity of bullet in fps) x (diameter of bullet in inches)) / 7000 (grains/lb conversion), for (lb-ft-inch/sec)
 

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Energy = KINETIC energy = (1/2) x (mass) x (velocity squared)
or, KE = (0.5) x (m) x (v^2)
momentum = power factor = (mass) x (velocity)
Tyler KO = ((mass of bullet in grains) x ("velocity of bullet in fps) x (diameter of bullet in inches)) / 7000 (grains/lb conversion), for (lb-ft-inch/sec)
^^^Yeah,what he said ;) :D ^^^
 
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