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Anybody remember this?
I strictly shoot CCI Velocitor .22 LR 40-grain copper-plated hollow points in my 2 Ruger 10 /22 Rifles below and have put down several Wild Boar & Coyotes with the Velocitor ammo. Sometimes I shoot the Winchester & Browning offerings of the same exact loading, but I prefer the Nickel-plated shell case of the CCI Loading, but I get the same performance out of all three. I would like to get VELOCITOR laser engraved on my Stocks Below



 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When CCI launched Velocitor in 2002 I saw a Ruger 10/22 outfitted with a custom made wood stock. It featured a Jurassic Park -esque Velociraptor carved into it along with some CCI and Velocitor logos. I know they are super rare because I can't even find an image of one on Google. Even the CCI Social Media Team has nothing to offer. I am here to find a picture of one so I can recreate it myself.
 

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When CCI launched Velocitor in 2002 I saw a Ruger 10/22 outfitted with a custom made wood stock. It featured a Jurassic Park -esque Velociraptor carved into it along with some CCI and Velocitor logos. I know they are super rare because I can't even find an image of one on Google. Even the CCI Social Media Team has nothing to offer. I am here to find a picture of one so I can recreate it myself.
I would like to have one of those old stocks, But that would be awesome if I could get my stocks engraved like that on both of my 10 / 22 rifles above. that would be impressive for sure. Velocitor on the foregrip and CCI just above the MAG well and the Velociraptor Dinosaur Image Logo. That would be so cool!
 

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Velociraptor meaning "swift seizer" in Latin) is a genus of dromaeosaurid theropod dinosaur that lived approximately 75 to 71 million years ago during the latter part of the Cretaceous Period. Two species are currently recognized, although others have been assigned in the past. The type species is V. mongoliensis; fossils of this species have been discovered in Mongolia. A second species, V. osmolskae, was named in 2008 for skull material from Inner Mongolia, China.



Velociraptor (commonly shortened to "raptor") is one of the dinosaur genera most familiar to the general public due to its prominent role in the Jurassic Park motion picture series. In real life, however, Velociraptor was roughly the size of a turkey, considerably smaller than the approximately 2 m (6+1⁄2 ft) tall and 80 kg (180 lb) reptiles seen in the films (which were based on members of the related genus Deinonychus). Today, Velociraptor is well known to paleontologists, with over a dozen described fossil skeletons, the most of any dromaeosaurid. One particularly famous specimen preserves a Velociraptor locked in combat with a Protoceratops.



The "Fighting Dinosaurs" specimen, found in 1971, preserves a Velociraptor mongoliensis and Protoceratops andrewsi in combat and provides direct evidence of predatory behavior. When originally reported, it was hypothesized that the two animals drowned.[6] However, as the animals were preserved in ancient sand dune deposits, it is now thought that the animals were buried in sand, either from a collapsing dune or in a sandstorm. Burial must have been extremely fast, judging from the lifelike poses in which the animals were preserved. Parts of the Protoceratops are missing, which has been seen as evidence of scavenging by other animals. Comparisons between the scleral rings of Velociraptor, Protoceratops, and modern birds and reptiles indicates that Velociraptor may have been nocturnal, while Protoceratops may have been cathemeral, active throughout the day during short intervals, suggesting that the fight may have occurred at twilight or during low-light conditions.

The distinctive claw, on the second digit of dromaeosaurids, has traditionally been depicted as a slashing weapon; its assumed use being to cut and disembowel prey. In the "Fighting Dinosaurs" specimen, the Velociraptor lies underneath, with one of its sickle claws apparently embedded in the throat of its prey, while the beak of Protoceratops is clamped down upon the right forelimb of its attacker. This suggests Velociraptor may have used its sickle claw to pierce vital organs of the throat, such as the jugular vein, carotid artery, or trachea (windpipe), rather than slashing the abdomen. The inside edge of the claw was rounded and not unusually sharp, which may have precluded any sort of cutting or slashing action, although only the bony core of the claw is preserved. The thick abdominal wall of skin and muscle of large prey species would have been difficult to slash without a specialized cutting surface.

In Short one Bad A.S.S. .22 Long Rifle Cartridge NAMESAKE for one Bad A.S.S. Dinosaur!
 
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