Trigger tricked out.

Discussion in 'Ruger Revolver Forums' started by buster40c, Sep 6, 2015.

  1. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

    8,549
    267
    83
    I thought it might be interesting to see what guns you have done trigger kits or trigger tricked out repairs on and what the results were.
    If your original trigger you would rate a 5 on a 1-10 scale how would you then rate your trigger after your mods done to it? Did you do the repairs yourself and how would you rate the difficulty was in doing the job on a 1-10 basis?
     
  2. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

    2,139
    17
    38
    Buster,

    I had a reputable gunsmith polish all the action on the trigger assembly and prior to that, the trigger measured @6lbs. It is now down to 4. Before he did the job, it had a slight pull to it but after the pull you could feel a "grit" to it before it would discharge. I wasn't comfortable with that. It gave you a false sense of when the trigger would actually make the pistol fire. I explained to him my problems yet stressed that I did NOT want the trigger below 4lbs. pull. Now I KNOW when the trigger will start the discharge. I know some guys think that (especially in competition shooting) they want a 2lb. pull. Personally I don't want that. I feel that if you want a light trigger pull, it should be for competition only! I know of one guy who carries a "race" pistol and I think he likes to show it off. Frankly, if he had any sense he would keep it hidden (concealed) and not use it as carry/defense. I think it shows stupidity. The NRA states the pistol should surprise you when discharged and I think it should go off when YOU think it should. Now this is just my personal opinion and I am sure some will disagree however I do not want an AC when wearing my .45. It took me a few times of shooting to get used to 4lbs. as there is a great difference in a 2lbs. reduction. Would I do it again? Absolutely YES!

    Tommy

    BTW- to answer your first question. I am not willing nor feel that I have the ability to accurately and safely do the trigger myself. Cost of doing the trigger was $75.00. Prior to the trigger repair I would rate the pistol @ 5-6 (1 being the best and 10 the lowest rating) range and afterwards I would give it a strong 2. I hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2015

  3. hodge

    hodge New Member

    275
    2
    0
    I installed a Rock River stage-2 trigger on my AR-556. I'm not a good judge, because this was my first AR, and the only other two that I had ever shot was a friends AR 556, and a M&P Sport. I will say that the stock Ruger trigger was better, in my opinion, than the Smith. Judging my AR, the Rock River is crisper, has less take up, and a shorter reset (than the stock trigger). All in all, it is a more precise trigger. Pull is about the same. For me, it was worth the money.

    If the stock trigger was a 5, I would rate the Rock River an 8. Assembly was pretty easy- out of 10, a 3 on the difficulty scale (with 10 being hard).

    Duh- sorry that I didn't read the thread category. My apologies!
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2015
  4. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

    2,733
    24
    38
    Tommy, I'm thinking that the NRA's 'surprise' recommendation is intended to cure the flinch. Ha; I recall shooting an old military rifle with a long, rough, 'stack-up' trigger, and flinching at least twice before the thing eventually fired. Last time I took the Virginian Dragoon (very light, smooth trigger) to the range, I was surprised a couple times - the hammer dropped before I got it on target. Probably not what the NRA was talking about.
     
  5. MagBlackhawk

    MagBlackhawk Patriot

    2,150
    100
    73
    So if the best trigger is a 10.
    And the hardest to install would be a 10, then this is my ratings.

    For my 10/22 I bought a modified hammer and a trigger with an over travel adjustment screw from Clark's Custom Guns.
    I installed it myself. Next time I would take a pic before I take it apart. LOL. So ease of install, about a 5 (?) for the first time apart.
    That setup makes for a good clean safe hunting trigger that is light enough for bench shooting. I call it a 10 for my purposes.

    For my Single Six I installed a 30 oz wolf trigger spring. Installation, a 1 = easy. Function = 10 (Just right).
    That gun is sooo light I could not hold it still while pressing the trigger when stock. Now, VERY accurate.

    My .357 Blackhawk, a 40 oz trigger spring. I'd give it the same rating as above.
    The .357 had a lighter trigger pull to start with and has more weight to help hold it steady.

    Lucky for me , both S/A's had creep-free triggers right out of the box.

    EDIT Note: All of my hammer springs are the standard factory parts. If I had to change one to get what I wanted I would.
    Never thought to change both trigger & hammer springs on the SP101 we sold when the trigger got to be too much for the wife.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2015
  6. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

    8,549
    267
    83
    Hodge it doesn't necessarily have to be a revolver. I just thought since many revolvers have a heavy DA pull that would be why many do kit the triggers.
    I figured as many posts about trigger kit work that this thread would get some good feed back. I just wondered about the results from doing them. Very interesting so far all positive comments about having done them. I am watching to see if any comments about having light strikes after trigger work.
     
  7. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

    2,733
    24
    38
    I have a theory (entirely unsubstantiated, by me anyway) that single action revolvers can tolerate a relatively light hammer spring - because the long throw gives the hammer time to accelerate. I have never owned a single action revolver with an objectionable trigger. I did check one of those $179 'made in America' revolvers at the local LGS the other day, and the trigger was startlingly bad, but there's no chance of me owning it.
     
  8. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    1
    0
    This is a good subject considering the "trigger pull mania" that seems to have struck the shooting universe. And I admit, I am caught up in it too.

    I do my own work, whenever possible, and hate when I can't.

    on my security six I put in a lighter trigger spring (wolff only had the one) and on difficulty, it was a 3, on difference, went from 5 to 8. I also polished all contact surfaces, of the trigger and the double action sear of the hammer. I did not touch the single action hammer sear or the hammer spring. It went from a 9lb double to 5 and from a 5single to a 3.5

    on my S&W 29-2 .357, I put in a wolf rebound spring, and did the same polishing job as security six. This was just a little more complicated, 5 in difficulty, difference 5 to 9.5 , trigger pull sooooo smooth now 5 double, 3 single.

    SR9C put in a ghost trigger reset bar. Definitely more difficult, it had to be almost all dismantled. 8 . It made a slight difference in trigger pull but the biggest difference was in the takeup/slack distance and the reset distance. 5 to about 8.

    Tisas 1911 .45acp . The 1911 is beautiful. But the trigger pull was at 9lb. Ridiculous for a 1911. I put in a slightly lighter mainspring (that was actually the most difficult portion, and even that wasn't too bad) I polished every contact glass smooth- the trigger bow, the trigger track, the disconnector, the sear, the sear spring. Difficulty, 7 . What I did not have the skill or the jig to do, was polish the hammer hooks. A smith had to do it for me. I had to pay him $15. It is now a 3.5 pound trigger. Difference from a 2 to a 10. With no light strikes from the slightly lighter mainspring.

    FNS40 Fantastic FNH quality gun. The only trouble is out of the box, the 40 and 9 are gritty triggers, with a little too hard of a pull. It all smooths out famously with numerous dry/live fires, but I hurried it along some, by polishing the trigger bar and sear contacts myself. Difficulty, 6 . Difference, 5 to 8 with very smooth and 5 pound pull.

    My other guns have no aftermarket trigger improvement options nor anything that can be polished to make more than a miniscule difference.

    Like I said, I love doing my own work. One of the first things I do with a gun after shooting it the first time, is take it completely apart and see what I can do to make a difference. It is sometimes nothing, but sometimes enough to bring a certain satisfaction that comes from doing it myself (and not turning it into a paperweight lol).

    Doc
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2015
  9. bikeride4fun

    bikeride4fun NRA Benefactor Member

    1,345
    5
    0
    I did a thread/post on here call Sp101 and Wolff spring kit.... I did pics through the whole process, it was simple and produced great results......
     
  10. berettabone

    berettabone In the army now..

    475
    0
    0
    I replaced the springs on my wife's WC SP101, but had a gunsmith polish all trigger areas, and do an oil dip. I didn't trust myself to be able to get the pistol back together. As we all know, taking things apart is way easier than putting them back together. The original trigger pulls on SP's aren't horrible, just gritty, and not smooth. I went with the lowest spring change weight that I could do, safely. I wasn't necessarily looking for super light, just smooth, which I think is most important. It turned out just that. The trigger improvement is very noticeable, especially with the smoothness. A 9# hammer spring, an 8# trigger spring, some polish, and you can't get a much better trigger for a revolver. The wife's accuracy increased 10 fold, after smoothing out the trigger. Definitely worth doing if you own an SP. I would give the trigger a 4 or 5 stock, would give it a strong 9 after.
     
  11. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

    8,549
    267
    83
    I thank you all for your response. I imagine some that were contemplating doing their own trigger work might just do it now.
    I have been wondering if I could make the M/C 357 trigger even better than the stock trigger which is really nice as it is?
     
  12. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    1
    0
    Absolutely you can. Wolff has reduced power trigger springs for the GP100 and I just looked and there are numerous very good videos showing how to replace it. You probably should not attempt to do any polishing. On the GP100 there really is not anything that will significantly make a difference besides the sear contacts. And if you do not know what you are doing you can get in serious trouble. Usually, I would say go for it, the worst that happens is you have to replace a hammer for $25/30 but there does not seem to be any GP100 hammers in stock anywhere.

    You can also replace the hammer spring pretty easily, but I would not go below 11 pounds. "They" say 10, but why take chances, you will not notice the difference between 10 and 11 anyways.

    Doc
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2015
  13. nickndfl

    nickndfl Active Member

    485
    69
    28
    Changed the springs and polished the trigger in my SP101 .357 mag BNIB. It's very light and smooth now. FYI, if you shoot a few hundred rounds before you do the swap you will find disassembly & reassembly easier. The tolerances on a brand new gun are very tight. I would gather Ruger uses a light hydraulic press to seat the trigger because it took full gorilla force to remove it.
     
  14. survivaladvisor

    survivaladvisor New Member

    10
    2
    3
    10/22

    I bought the Volquartsen trigger parts in my Talo Itec 10/22, and polished them to a chrome like finish, installed them and lubed with synthetic oil and grease. The result is a 1 1/2 pound pull with a touch of creep. I would rate it as a 9 1/2. I also installed a CMC straight competition trigger in my AR 556. It resulted in a very crisp 2 1/2 pound pull with NO creep. I would rate that one at full 10. I have installed a Ghost tactical trigger bar in my SR 9. It has a funny feel, about 6 pounds, but works very well. I'd give that one a 9 1/2. Yeah, I've been called a "trigger bigot".
     
  15. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

    8,549
    267
    83
    Survivaladvisor welcome to Rugertalk. It is customary for newcomers to go Introduction section and introduce yourself to the other members. That will get you into the family circle discussions quicker.
    Thanks , Buster
    Sounds like you have several guns with hair triggers now.
     
  16. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear New Member

    61
    4
    0
    After 30+ years of having my own gunsmith shop, I've literally done trigger/action tunes to everything. I do use Wolff springs exclusively when changing springs when they make them for the brand/model/platform I'm working on, but have had to make my own springs before. A lot of people think a simple spring replacement or polishing hammer constitutes a trigger job. If done properly there's a lot more to it than that. The main thing to remember IF you have to reduce the amount of sear engagement is to NOT change angles, and it's a LOT easier to take more off a bit at a time than it is to put it back on when went too far!
     
  17. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

    8,549
    267
    83
    ^^^^^^^^^^ That's what bothers me about polishing. Afraid I might take to much off or screw up the angles. I am lucky to sharpen a knife without ending up with a toothpick for a blade. I saw a guy at work do that to his knife. I wouldn't want to mess up my gun like that.
     
  18. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear New Member

    61
    4
    0
    It's easy, just go S L O W,attention to detail, don't get distracted, and just slick up-NOT change dimension in any way.