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Patriot
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ever try shooting while moving?
Not going from station to station but firing while in motion.
Walking forward, moving to the side or in any other direction. Not nearly so easy as Hollywood makes it look.

The first few times I tried it I couldn't hit nutten. Then I figured out, keep your knees bent at all times and work on being as smooth as possible.
Seems to help if you place your heel down first with each step. When moving to the side place the outside (knife edge) of your foot down first.
You know you're getting it when your sights don't bounce all over the place.
Even though I've been shooting for many years, shooting on the move is kinda new to me. And I haven't even tried it with a long gun yet.

Anyone have some helpful information you'd like to share?
 

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You are right, it is much harder than it looks on tv.

I could , for a while, back a few years, hit a full size silhouette , while moving forward and straight backward. Dint do so good moving sideways.

Now with all my body aches and pains, I don't even try anymore,
Havent practiced it in a couple years.

But it wasn't an aim and shoot,
It was a point and shoot thing, it worked good enough..;):)



Jim
 

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Probably like a lot of other endeavors, the body and the brain get the hang of it with practice. Maybe 'laser training' would be good, for starters anyway. Personally, I am getting pretty good at UNlearning. Already the old bod has forgot how to run, and the brain can't handle getting the coffee brewing while figuring what to get for breakfast. Have to do the one, and then the other.
 

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I guess this might explain why cops miss their targets so often. Standing still, sighting the target, taking aim then pulling the trigger takes time that in many possible scenarios just is not there. Then also like Mag said you don't want to be moving in straight lines either. Punching paper from a stand still barely prepares someone for a shooting scenario.
Finding a range or a club that you can practice on the move shooting are rare I would think.
 

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Patriot
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You know you're getting it when your sights don't bounce all over the place.
But it wasn't an aim and shoot,
It was a point and shoot thing, it worked good enough..;):)
Jim
Maybe 'laser training' would be good, for starters anyway.
Even though I said something about your sights....... Jim is right, it is a point shooting thing.
And VT has a good idea about using a laser.

Thanks guys. :Cooltu:
 

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Years back I did a week at Thunder Ranch when Clint Smith still was in Texas. A big part was shooting while in motion - progressing and retreating as well as lateral movements. Also did a bunch in a live fire simulated building scenario that was of course, shoot & move. Did this in daylight as well as low-light conditions. It isn't Hollywood easy. There was a big city SWAT team there at the same class and they too weren't Hollywood proficient.
It's SOO easy and typical for people to think, it's just buy a gun, take the basic 8 hr class and spend a few hours at the range standing still and shooting at a stationary target. Hopefully those that ignorant never have to find out how incorrect they are.
 

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That's why they say people that carry guns for self protection live under a false sense of security. I saw a video of a gun classroom full of students that thought being armed they were safer than not having a gun. All the guns were actually unloaded and for a drill a man barged into the classroom and started firing. Not a one of the students got a shot off at the intruder. Guns hanging up on clothing or dropped or just couldn't get to their gun while trying to find cover from the shooter. It was quite eye opening to say the least.
I so liked the experience of the Gander Mountain 260 degree shooting simulator. Sort of like what a police academy might have only on a smaller scale.
 

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Very good example Buster! Completely agree with the case sense of security aspect. Although, I do honestly believe many carry just for the testosterone boost and attention so actually being realistically prepared is far down on their list. Personally, I'd like to see higher minimums required and that they include some sort of stressful scenario shooting. Would open a LOT of eyes. Simulators are better than nothing but to get the full effect - real firing of live ammo, in a real setting can't be beat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Years back I did a week at Thunder Ranch when Clint Smith still was in Texas. A big part was shooting while in motion - progressing and retreating as well as lateral movements.
Is there anything you learned that you could pass along?
I understand 'hands on' is the best way and it may be difficult (if not impossible) to put in print.
 

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I participate in live fire "simunition" exercises once a year or so. Great training program- paintball on steroids, uses conventional weapons with conversion kits and "Simunition". The bad guys get to shoot back- it's a step up from a target house. Live "hostages", the works. Awesome.
 

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^^^^Yep that sounds like the real deal practice/training there.
 

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Is there anything you learned that you could pass along?
I understand 'hands on' is the best way and it may be difficult (if not impossible) to put in print.
Hard to really explain but certainly that there's always room for additional learning. Those thinking they're knowing all they need when they took the most basic (i.e. Cheap) course they could take are SO VERY fooling themselves.
 

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Tommycourt
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That's why they say people that carry guns for self protection live under a false sense of security. I saw a video of a gun classroom full of students that thought being armed they were safer than not having a gun. All the guns were actually unloaded and for a drill a man barged into the classroom and started firing. Not a one of the students got a shot off at the intruder. Guns hanging up on clothing or dropped or just couldn't get to their gun while trying to find cover from the shooter. It was quite eye opening to say the least.
I so liked the experience of the Gander Mountain 260 degree shooting simulator. Sort of like what a police academy might have only on a smaller scale.
I also saw the same film and remember that all through the scenario no one got a shot off. They were really off guard and many were surprised on how fast things can happen. If you haven't seen the vid, it's well worth you time to look it up on You Tube and see if it still exists. It's well worth the time spent and a real eye opener. Glad Buster brought this up.

Tommy
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hard to really explain but certainly that there's always room for additional learning. Those thinking they're knowing all they need when they took the most basic (i.e. Cheap) course they could take are SO VERY fooling themselves.
Show me a guy that knows it all and I'll show you a guy that can't learn anything. :rolleyes:
 
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