Ruger Talk Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
What's you're intention for the gun? Will you need high magnification? Large objective? Decide on the needs and you'll weed out a lot of options. For an all around plinker, I'd go with a standard 3-9x40 or perhaps a 2-7x32. Mate the level of the scope to that of the rest of the gun. In other words, don't skimp and go with a $25 no-name but going with a Zeiss would be quite overkill. I'd start at a Mueller as a minimum. Very nice optics for the price. From there, Weaver or Nikon even a Burris (my preferred option)
Something to consider...poor optics are only magnified with increased power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,469 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What's you're intention for the gun? Will you need high magnification? Large objective? Decide on the needs and you'll weed out a lot of options. For an all around plinker, I'd go with a standard 3-9x40 or perhaps a 2-7x32. Mate the level of the scope to that of the rest of the gun. In other words, don't skimp and go with a $25 no-name but going with a Zeiss would be quite overkill. I'd start at a Mueller as a minimum. Very nice optics for the price. From there, Weaver or Nikon even a Burris (my preferred option)
Something to consider...poor optics are only magnified with increased power.

Thanks for the response. My intention is for punching paper at 50 to 100 yards and casual plinking.
I've read that the scope mount rail that comes with the Ruger is not as good as some aftermarket rails, do you have any thoughts on that.
I was looking at a rim fire Nikon scope that looked appropriate. A friend has a Burris on his AR that he's happy with. I'm also looking into Vortex too, they seem to have good products.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
Well, I've got 17 or 18 different 10/22's here currently of which only one is stock. The rest all have been built up to some degree or another ranging from mild to :eek: Have built an another 3 for others. Some have gotten the standard Ruger factory scope mount and have been just as good for providing a solid foundation for the rings as the more expensive and fanacy named ones on the other builds. (what one got used was determined by which fit the style of the build). Nowadays it seems unless it's Picatinney, it's sub-par and not worthwhile. I see that as more keeping with a trendy and fashion that actually being a necessity. Haven't found any of these that the standard Weaver mount wasn't providing exactly as I wanted.
Reminder...when mounting the scope mount base, use a verrrrrrrrrry small dab or Loctite one the screws (or if none around, you can get by with nail polish) Do this with the bolt removed from the receiver so you're sure to not get any inside the action just in case you have too big of a dab. LoL
 

·
Patriot
Joined
·
2,160 Posts
I've only ever used a scope on one .22 rifle, the almost bone stock 10/22 I have now. To me it's just for plinking, cheap fun shooting and squirrel hunting.
So my input may not be very valuable on this subject but......

I love the Vortex Diamondback 2-7x35 rimfire scope that sits atop that rifle.
The scope is large enough that it sorta dwarfs that little carbine but it works great. It's clear, bright enough and you can see the bullet holes @ 50 yd targets.
At 100 yd's, the bullet holes are harder to see on plain paper when up on 7 power. Reactive targets, no problem.
When down on 2 power, you can shoot 5 ft (or less) in front of the muzzle and actually see what you're shooting!
Lower magnification settings are also good for keeping running game in your field of view.

Danged if I can see anything wrong with the rail that came with that rifle.

Just my .02 worth. :)
 

·
Tommycourt
Joined
·
2,139 Posts
I have an old Remington 541S with a 4X Weaver 40th anniversary with inlaid on it. I have had this rifle for almost 30 years and
wanted something to match the engraving on the rifle, hence the Weaver scope. We used to do a lot of steel target shooting @50-100 yards respectively. The 50 yard was no problem but at 100 yds. I had to use some Kentucky wind age. The scope is still in good shape after all these years. But these days are a whole bunch different and most of all the rifles I see, regardless of caliber seem to be leaning towards a Picatinny rail. Glass and glass mounting has changed a whole bunch in my shooting years.

Tommy

P.S. I mounted the scope using all Weaver mounts and engraved rings also.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top