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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In my searches I have run across guns without safety switches. Being that I am a newbie, I am not sure if I should even consider buying a gun with no safety. But on the other hand, some say it is just handicap when trying to defend yourself under stress. Still others say that to have a gun with no safety is to be negligent and endangering to yourself and others. I know that a safety is not to be 100% reliable since it is a mechanical stop and could fail. Thoughts anyone?
 

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I have no problem with a cc gun having a safety. Personally I don't like carrying a 1911 cocked, locked and loaded relying on the safety not getting knocked out of safe position and blowing a hole in my leg.
If a person practices with a carry gun always with the safety on then their mind should cause first move to be taking gun safety off.
This discussion is exactly why I chose to carry a double action only revolver for my carry gun. No safety to take off and no hair trigger to be concerned about.

This discussion is one of those never ending debates. To each his own as to what he feels comfortable with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So since you brought up the revolver, is capacity or lack thereof a concern when considering revolvers. People seem to point that fact out and pull to the semi autos all the time. I know, all the statistics about gunfights being mostly one on one and in the space of a living room blah blah blah but how disconcerting is it for you to know you only have 4-6 shots available (judging by the capacity of most wheel guns. I personally kinda like the wheel guns because of the factors you mentioned. Add to that the history and quintessential American west feeling and appearance. But I was turned off of them by the "Capacity preachers"
 

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AKA Rawhidekid!
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You might be surprised at what constitutes a safety. The heavy trigger of a double action is it's safety, the DE cocker setting a semi auto back to a double action pull for the first shot is a safety. The best safety is between your ears, don't touch the trigger until you are ready to shoot and know your target.;)
 

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I personally don't like safeties unless the gun is a single action only with a light trigger.

My Lc9s pro has no safety, and that's the way I like it. The trigger is a tad on the light side, but it's not short. And my holster completely covers the trigger. I feel perfectly comfortable carrying with one in the pipe ImageUploadedByRuger Forum1481090995.303147.jpg

I've been shooting revolvers all my life -since I was 10 years old. I'm used to the trigger and that is, IMHO, the simplest and safest way to carry. A DA revolver with the hammer down. If you've ever shot a revolver, even an LCR with that nice, light, smooth pull, you know that trigger ain't getting pulled unless you pull it.

On the capacity issue, I don't think that 6 rounds of .357 magnum is undergunned. If you really feel the need for 17 rounds, carry a duty sized 9mm. Heavy and hard to conceal, but it does give you capacity.
My EDC, (the Lc9s) holds 7+1. A carry revolver holds 5-6 of a more powerful cartridge. I'd say they even out.
 

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Tommycourt
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For self defense I carry a SR1911 Ruger in #2 position. In other words the pistol has 1 in the chamber but I have to manually cock the pistol in order to fire. I don't like to carry it in a #1 position due to the fact that there is a possibility that the safety could slide up into a fire position. That means that when I draw I have to do it faster than a double action trigger. Weight is certainly something to consider. My .45 weighs 30 ounces without any ammo in it. When you add the ammo, you can feel the difference. Starting out, you must consider how much you are going to carry it, and how much weight do you want to have on your person. I have to agree with some of the other guys, a revolver is safer to carry in most incidences. Double action revolvers do a fine job but generally will be heavier. Single action will be similar to my .45, it must be cocked before firing. The bigger the caliber, generally the heavier the pistol will be. Consider all factors before purchasing. Only you can make that decision. Don't go by what Joe Blow says. Try some pistols out before buying if you can or rent one at the range and see how it feels to you. Buy the pistol that fits YOU and will take care of YOUR needs and yours only. MHO is all!

Tommy
 

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Patriot
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Personally I see no need for a manual safety on a DA/SA auto loader. With the hammer down it takes a long trigger pull to fire, very much like a DA revolver.
Same with a striker fired auto although the trigger pull is usually shorter and lighter.

The 1911 type (SA only) needs a safety. I'd carry a 1911 cocked and locked in a good holster without fear.

IMHO, Any pistol with a safety should be of the type (like a 1911) that you can easily 'swipe' to the off position with the thumb after drawing from a holster.
Beretta puts them on the Slide! What were they thinking....

Oh yeah. Capacity of ammo, more is better. ;)
 

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I grew up with the 1911, the K and the N frame Smith and Wesson. I like a single action trigger, and like Tommy court, do not use the manual safety on the 1911. I also carry the 1911 C2, which in my opinion is the way that JMB in vision ed his creation to be carried. Remember the practices of the day, and the fact that JMB did not put a thumb safety on his creation until the US Calvary demanded one, but that is a discussion for another day.

My normal practice is to thumb cock to prepare to shoot, something I did until my like of the Kahr DAO pistols changed my ways. Personally, I like the K.I.S.S. principle, make it as easy as possible. No extra moves, such as cocking or swiping a safety.

I recently bought two pistols, the LCP II, and the American Compact. I like them because they are single action, the hammer or striker is fully cocked, the triggers are great, especially the American Compact! I have complete confidence that they will not fire unless the trigger is depressed. They are equipped with passive safeties.I do believe the holster is very important, don't get a generic one made to fit several pistols, but one specifically fitted to your pistol. I have mine made by MTR Custom Leather out of Ramser NC.

Whether or not you use a handgun with a manually equipped safety is a personal choice. What ever you choose practice with it until it's operation becomes second nature to you. Take some classes, can you operate it under duress when fine motor skills go away? Ever seen the movie Glory? There is a lot of truth to the scene where the soldier was having trouble loading his rifled musket when his commander was discharging his pistol next to him.
 

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All guns have safeties, of one manner or another (some having more than one). I am most comfortable with a single action and a manual safety, as Tommy shared. I typically carry a Sig P938 or 238, locked and cocked and the safety on. I am well versed in drawing and flicking the safety off as I bring the gun up, so a manual safety isn't an issue for me. Regardless of which format you settle on, the key is training with it. There is no safety system that is going to compensate for little or no training.
 

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I feel more comfortable with a thumb safety as on my LC9s. I carried a M1911 for years in the Corps. I could flip that thumb safety off in fraction of a second.

My LC9s is always in 7+1 readiness. I just don't want to risk a discharge unless I intentionally pull the trigger. I also practice switching the safety off while drawing. It really is very easy to become good at doing.

The reports of people shooting themselves accidentally with a gun with no safety are not hard to find on the Internet.

Here are a few urls. The first one involves a Glock 40 that I believe only has a trigger safety. The second is a guy shooting himself while drawing.

[ame]https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YSbOMzzXamY[/ame]

[ame]https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zYvAxLX6OzE[/ame]
 

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I like a safety on an auto. I carry an LC9s and swiping my thumb down as the gun comes up is second nature to me now. I would have to concentrate to NOT do it. So I don't find it to be any problem at all. As for no safety, there's a reason that a person who shoots himself while drawing or holstering a striker fired, no safety having auto, is often said to have "Glocked" himself...

BTW I think wheelguns are just fine. Anybody who says that a proficient shooter with a .357 is undergunned is nuts IMO.
 

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AKA Rawhidekid!
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I would just like to add this personal observation; in many years of carrying cocked and locked, the only times I ever had a safety slide off was thumb strap holsters. I never had a safety come off with an open topped holster.
 

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I would just like to add this personal observation; in many years of carrying cocked and locked, the only times I ever had a safety slide off was thumb strap holsters. I never had a safety come off with an open topped holster.

I dumped my thumb strap holster for that very reason.
 

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^^ That's interesting to hear. A thumb strap is for safety yet it can remove a safety. Experience should be heard.
 

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If that were true, there would be no accidents of any kind because our minds would always safeguard us.

Well, see, some people don't have a whole lot going on in between their ears......
 
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