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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am having trouble getting all the black carbon residue off of the cylinder face around the chamber holes. I have tried Frog Lube solvent, but the residue does not seem to want to come off.

Would a little gentle scrubbing with bronze wool & solvent help?

Anyone having any luck getting all this stuff off?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Simi-Chrome is a good idea, Jim. I have a tube of that in my garage that I use to clean the exhaust tips on my cars. I'll give that a shot. Thanks
 

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I am having trouble getting all the black carbon residue off of the cylinder face around the chamber holes. I have tried Frog Lube solvent, but the residue does not seem to want to come off.

Would a little gentile scrubbing with bronze wool & solvent help?

Anyone having any luck getting all this stuff off?
Birchwood Casey Lead remover cloth: Works wonders on carbon buildup and lead buildup:

http://www.amazon.com/LEAD-REMOVER-...0&keywords=birchwood+caser+lead+remover+cloth
 

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Just be careful when using lead removal clothes on a blued gun. It can remove the bluing. On SS it's just fine.
 

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On stainless guns I use Rem Oil. Put a little on a rag. I first brush off the worst with a bronze brush. Works great for cleaning cylinder flutes. Never tried it on blued guns. I would think it would work, but I would be careful the first time.
As a lube, I find Rem Oil doesn't last very long, so I add a little 3 in 1 oil to the moving parts.
I shoot 40-50 thousand shells a year , mostly through revolvers, so I clean and lube what works best for me. My guns sometimes get pretty dirty before I clean them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
After reading several other articles on cleaning the cylinder face of revolvers, I have come across many folks who say that Flitz & SimiChrome are abrasives and will remove metal from the finish, thus reducing the gap between the cylinder face and the forcing cone - they all state that this is not desirable. I don't know how many polishings it would take to increase this gap to a significantly detrimental length.

I have also read that many people use M-Pro 7 cleaner to remove these carbon stains. Think I will get a bottle of that today and give it a try. Once I get the black off, I will keep a coating of FrogLube or TW25B grease on the cylinder face to reduce any future staining and to make it easier to get off in the future.

Thanks for all the suggestions.

Here is an update: Got some M-Pro7 this afternoon. Earlier this morning, I tried the TW25B degreaser/cleaner on the cylinder face, with a nylon brush. With some elbow grease, that removed about 75% of the scorch rings. Tried the M-Pro7 this afternoon and that did not really perform any better than the TW25B. I might try a little ball of bronze wool and see if that works better than the nylon brush. Bronze wool should not cut into the stainless steel, since it is softer than steel.
 

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For my stainless guns I use Hoppes #9 bore cleaner on a brass brush. Works every time.

For my blued guns I use the Hoppes #9 with a nylon brush. I probably do not get all the carbon off this way but frankly it is hard to tell.

The one solid advantage that stainless revolvers have is that there is no doubt as to whether you got all that carbon off of the front of the cylinder.
 

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I read on here somewhere that they make a solution of 50% white vinegar and 50% hydrogen peroxide. Let it soak for half an hour and Wa-La.

Maybe that was for lead??
 

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For a Stainless revolver one of those "Lead Away" cloths works great on the front cylinder, and around the forcing cone. (Do not use for a blued gun). When I have a stubborn deposit that the Hoppes #9 bore cleaner and bronze brush can't get off, this always works and does no harm at all to a stainless gun.
 

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Another vote for the Kleen Bore Lead Away cloths. But one and it will last a long while. I usually use mine after cleaning the rest of the gun but before lube and re-case.

"I don't always clean the cylinder face of my revolvers, but when I do, I use the lead-away cloths. "
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Guys, I appreciate all the tips. However, regarding the lead away cloth, I contacted the manufacturer and they confirmed that they do contain an abrasive and will remove metal from the gun. So everytime this cloth is applied to the cylinder face to remove carbon, you are also removing metal and increasing the cylinder gap, which is not good.

I have no idea how many applications it would take to remove enough metal to start causing a significant increase in the cylinder gap (cylinder gaps are only a few thousands of an inch to begin with), but it is not worth the risk to me. I am going to stick with a bronze brush and synthetic cleaning solvents (M-Pro7, MC25, FrogLube solvent), they seem to get most of it off.
 

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Hi Bob ...

In regards to your last comment ... I can tell you for certain that you will NEVER be able to take off even a "measurable" amount metal from the cylinder with a lowly lead away polishing cloth! Ruger stainless BORES sometimes take 150-250 fire-lapping bullets (~320 grit or so, a hundred times more coarse than a polishing cloth) to make ANY noteworthy change in internal dimensions .... And Ruger CYLINDERS are twice as hard as their barrels. I guess what i'm saying is ... Go ahead and TRY to take an appreciable amount of metal from that stainless cylinder. I dare ya. :p

I always chuckle when people say "don't take off any metel, just POLISH it..." ... they ARE still removing metal. --- :) --- Just VERYYYY slowly.

Or, here is a simile: changing cylinder dimensions with a polishing cloth is like digging a hole from the USA to China through the earth....with a dull, rusty spoon.

Disregard everything I've said for blued guns. The cloths WILL damage bluing.
 

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Hi Bob ...

In regards to your last comment ... I can tell you for certain that you will NEVER be able to take off even a "measurable" amount metal from the cylinder with a lowly lead away polishing cloth! Ruger stainless BORES sometimes take 150-250 fire-lapping bullets (~320 grit or so, a hundred times more coarse than a polishing cloth) to make ANY noteworthy change in internal dimensions .... And Ruger CYLINDERS are twice as hard as their barrels. I guess what i'm saying is ... Go ahead and TRY to take an appreciable amount of metal from that stainless cylinder. I dare ya. :p

I always chuckle when people say "don't take off any metel, just POLISH it..." ... they ARE still removing metal. --- :) --- Just VERYYYY slowly.

Or, here is a simile: changing cylinder dimensions with a polishing cloth is like digging a hole from the USA to China through the earth....with a dull, rusty spoon.

Disregard everything I've said for blued guns. The cloths WILL damage bluing.
+1 ... Exactly right. Your great great grandchildren will still be removing crud with the Lead Away cloth and the cylinder will not be measurably affected. I use the cloth without worry on my steel guns. Blued guns you do not use the cloth.

If you think about it, anything that will take the caked crud off the front of the cylinder is going to be a bit abrasive. That is the nature of gun cleaning.
 

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I use the KleenBore lead away cleaning cloths on my stainless SP101's and my MC GP100....For my blued 44 mag I will pour some Hoppe's No.9 in a small bowl and let the cylinder soak.....
 

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I just cleaned five range sessions worth of carbon from the cylinder face on my stainless-steel Bisley Vaquero .357 with ("Never-Dull" Magic Wadding Polish) that I purchased on Amazon.com. I was amazed at how well it worked with minimal elbow grease added. It only cost $8.29 per 5oz can. None of the well-known gun solvents and cleaners worked. "Never-Dull" works!
 
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