Removing a squib

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Tommycourt, Nov 6, 2016.

  1. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    I was re-reading some of our older threads and I came across an article where Buster was having troubles with a squib round. '' I took a punch and a hammer and knocked the bullet back out toward the open cylinder."

    Buster had used a punch and hammer. PLEASE DO NOT remove a squib in this manner. I don't mean to cause a CHIT storm however we all have ways of removing squibs and it should be done correctly.

    DO NOT use a punch when removing a squib round. You run the risk of residue powder in the chamber and also damaging the rifling or the inner part of the barrel. Spend a couple of dollars and run to the lumber or hardware store and purchase a wooden dowell rod and possibly a plastic or rubber hammer. Make sure your dowell rod is made of hard wood-ash or oak. By using a plastic hammer you are ensuring that you will not have a spark of residual powder in the bore.

    If you are shooting a 6" revolver, you want your dowell to be approx. 3" longer than the barrel. Measure the depth of the projectile by inserting the rod into the barrel and get the depth of the squib. If the squib is less than half the barrel length then attempt to drive to scrib TO the chamber. If it is passed the middle of the barrel then drive the dowell to the muzzle end of the gun. You may find that you will encounter more resistance when you drive the projectile to the muzzle end however you are protecting the bore from scratching or damaging the bore. But go slowly and the projectile will exit the bore. For semi-autos, the same applies however the safest way is towards the muzzle end. I should note that your dowell needs to be somewhat smaller than the bore of the weapon.

    If you are shooting a rifle, use your cleaning rod less the brush, measure the depth of the projectile and drive it to the muzzle end of the weapon with your plastic hammer. You have a larger diameter at the base of the bullet than you have on the front. Your cleaning rod should be made of aluminum as most are. On some models you may have to pull the bolt assembly out in order to remove the object stuck in the barrel. If there is unburnt powder, with a wooden dowell or aluminum you will not cause a spark, igniting any left powder in the bore. After the projectile is removed, check your bore for any bulges and if none are noted, clean the bore with a bore brush and the bore swab. Lightly oil the bore swab with Rem Oil or some sort of cleaning solvent.

    Remember squibs can be caused by more than one thing. Possibly a bad primer, a light load, wrong powder, or a poorly designed projectile.

    I know I will have some controversy over this method however this is the safest way to protect yourself and the protection of a gun.

    I am not yanking anyone's leg on this matter as it is far to serious to be kidding about it. Safety of firearms is the highest priority and we all want to be able to shoot as safely as possible.

    Tommy
     
  2. SavageGuy

    SavageGuy Active Member

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    The only squib I've had was when I made on on purpose to see if a powder-less round would cycle the slide on my pistol. They aren't easy to get out! Make sure you lube the bore really well before you start pounding. And yes, use a wooden dowel! It will eventually come out, just keep pounding.
     

  3. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    I hear you Tommy. I was lucky there was no damage to the barrel. I believe the LGS used a brass rod and lubed the barrel before knocking the bullet back out.
    I have had no squibs since making sure the cases got crimped.
     
  4. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    Good for you Buster!!!!! It makes me happy. Don't want anything happen to a fellow old codger!!!! And I ain't yanking your leg when I say that!!

    Tommy