Reloading for newbies?

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by conservative, Dec 8, 2016.

  1. conservative

    conservative New Member

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    Having never shot a gun before, should I buy some off the shelf ammo or buy some brass and make my own? Excuse terminology errors.
     
  2. phideaux

    phideaux Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Maybe I missed it.... but....do you own a gun?
    Of any kind ?




    Jim
     

  3. spikedriver

    spikedriver Active Member

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    I say buy your own. If you never owned a gun you don't even know for sure if you'll stay with it or you'll lose interest over time. You can't really justify the cost of reloading equipment if you don't shoot quite a bit of ammo. I have the equipment but I haven't shot enough ammo in the last couple years to bother reloading, plus I don't enjoy it as much as most of these guys here do. So my stuff is gathering dust at the moment. I'll get back to it someday. But there's a lot of money just sitting in a closet not getting used at the moment...
     
  4. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Spike. Reloading is real iffy for you seeing how you don't even own a gun yet.
    I suggest you buy a 9mm gun of some sort because 9mm ammo is about the cheapest caliber to buy other than 22lr. Better yet buy yourself a 22lr handgun so you can shoot to your hearts content for less than any other caliber. A Ruger SR22 or a Ruger MKIV aren't expensive and would be good guns for just getting into shooting.
     
  5. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    Spike and Buster are giving you good advice. Should you buy a gun, start of with a .22 or possibly a 9mm. .22 is the cheapest way to get to know whether you like shooting and how involved it can get. There is much more than just pulling the trigger. Since we don't know if you have a gun, it's hard to give anyone good advice. Reloading is way down the road if you don't already have a gun. Personally I would start off with a .22 since you can find a good used .22 and not spend a lot of money and the ammo is not pricey. If you find you really enjoy it, then proceed to a 9mm and start off slowly learning how to hold the gun, how to aim properly, how to correctly shoot. You can do all of this with a .22. Don't get the cart ahead of the horse. We have to crawl before we learn how to walk.

    Tommy
     
  6. SavageGuy

    SavageGuy Active Member

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  7. greg_r

    greg_r Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to take a different approach. Reloading can be a fun hobby in itself.

    First, get yourself some reloading manuals. I like the ABC'S of Reloading, Modern Reloading, and the Lyman manual. There are many more. Read them through cover to cover, several times.

    Find a friend who reloads, see if you can get the friend to tutor you. Be wary of you tube. Some are good, some scare me just watching them! After you read the manuals, really study them, you will know what's wrong and right. Believe the manuals!

    Shop carefully, you can get all the tools you need to start reloading for less than $100. Stick with name brand equipment. Lee makes an entry level press called the Reloder, RCBS makes one called the Partner. Scour yard sales, flea markets, auction sights. Either of these presses can be found in good used condition at very good prices. Their customer service is very good also. I set up a friend just a week or so ago for less than $80. Reloaded press Perfect Powder Measure, Safety scale, case prep tools, dies, and an electronic scale. All but the electronic scale was Lee Precision, the electronic scale was found on Amazon for $5! I can not remember the name of it, but it turned out to be the same scale as made for Hornady, just marketed for jewelers! If my friend likes reloading and moves up in equipment, he has a second press, which you will always have a use for, if he sells it, he will get his money back. Bargains are out there. Another friend bought a like new Lee Load Master progressive at a yard sale this past summer for $75!

    As to a handgun for a beginner? Semi Autos are all the rage now, but I will suggest a double action revolver. The manual of arms is simpler. Rim fire or centerfire, your choice. I would choose either 22 long rifle or 38 special. The 38 special is an easy case to reload for also. Take some pistol classes. Practice, practice, practice.

    And let me say again, buy some manuals, spend time at the library. Have a working knowledge of reloading before you buy your first piece of equipment.
     
  8. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    I like the Lee loading manual more than the Lyman 49th edition manual. The Lee gave more caliber loading data than the Lyman does,
     
  9. MagBlackhawk

    MagBlackhawk Patriot

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    "The ABC'S of Reloading".... I wonder if it's the same book I bought back in 1979 ~ 1980?
    There were a couple more good ones, can't remember the titles now.
    You can not have too much information when starting anything that's new to you.



    :GadsdenFlag:
     
  10. greg_r

    greg_r Well-Known Member

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    Probably, it was first published in the early 1970's.
     
  11. Uncle_Louie

    Uncle_Louie 1968 Ford Galaxie 500 XL

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    I would buy off the shelf and either go with an experienced shooter of get
    some instructions.

    Do you own a gun ??

    Do you have a permit, if so you should have had to shoot a gun ??
     
  12. conservative

    conservative New Member

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  13. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    Since you have never had a gun, nor had any experience with a gun, first thing I would do is join a class and learn about them.
    Starting out, a good .22 pistol will lend towards giving some good training. Whether it's a revolver or semi auto, you need to learn how to hold it, how to aim properly and to see how it handles. I would NOT be in a rush to run out and buy a gun just to say you have one. You can learn the principles with a .22 just as well as any other gun and progress from there. And here we go again with the same old thing: learn how to use it safely. Regardless of caliber, safety should be your number 1 concern.

    Tommy
     
  14. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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  15. conservative

    conservative New Member

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    Thanks buster40c . I am planning on doing that.
     
  16. squirrelhunter

    squirrelhunter Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Until you get a gun and use it awhile I wouldn't worry about reloading. Like said before it really doesn't pay to reload unless you do a lot of shooting. Shoot I was shooting/hunting for over 20 years before I started reloading,course my main thing is hunting/sighting them in so I don't go through a lot in a years time,not nearly what some of these guys do. Most of my shooting just to be shooting is with my handguns though and that's why I started reloading in the first place,but I had been shooting them for around 10 years before I got my reloading equipment.
     
  17. paulruger

    paulruger Active Member

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    Perhaps start with a 22 rifle?