Range report

Discussion in 'Ruger Center Fire Pistols' started by Tommycourt, Oct 11, 2015.

  1. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    Today was one of the worst days that I have had at the range in a long time. For some reason I was "flinching" and couldn't stop. I have no idea why. I would freeze my wrists, get a good grip, and as I started to pull the trigger, I would flinch. I don't know for sure but anticipation may have played a part in it too. After 60 rounds, I said I am wasting my time and decided to quit. I haven't been dry firing like I used to to may be I need to do more of that. If you have any other suggestions, I would sure like to hear them. I left not only disgusted but frustrated. Last week I was dead on. So let's hear it guys, I will take into consideration anything you have to say (boy, that left me wide open didn't it).:jawdrop:
    Tommy
     
  2. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    Was your flinched shots high or low or side to side? I found I almost always squeeze my fingers when pulling the trigger. I changed my grip to a really awkward feeling grip that did get me back centered better. I set up like I was a right hand shooter but left hand tripped the trigger. Felt really weird but did work for me. Amazing how we subconsciously train ourselves to react.
     

  3. thumbuster

    thumbuster New Member

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    I have to over come my own propensity to flinch every time I shoot. Sometimes it's exacerbated by coffee or just plain stress. I have an old shoulder injury so I use a pad when benching rifles or shooting shotguns. I also try to do hand exercises for shooting handguns. Practice with light loads and focused attention on technique help a great deal but off days still hapen.
     
  4. phideaux

    phideaux Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Tommy,

    Fuggidaboudit....accept that you were having a bad day.. and go back next week and you will be back on your game.

    DONT try to over analyze ..:)

    Jim
     
  5. berettabone

    berettabone In the army now..

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    It's all in your head. You just have to try and block out the recoil. I know it's sometimes easier said than done. Before I start shooting, I try and visualize the recoil, and tell myself that nothing bad is going to happen. I slow down, and keep this thought in my head the first few shots..................after that, everything is good with the shooting world. I had my wife use this technique, and it works for her. Haven't seen her flinch in a while.
     
  6. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    I thank all you guys and suggestions but I think you are right. My head was on backwards that day. Normally I will dry fire 8-10x at the range before shooting and I didn't take time to do it. Plus I think I was trying to "hurry" my rounds rather than go for the accuracy like I normally do. I been having a few health issues lately and I think that's in my head and not leaving it out when I hit the range. You gotta shoot with a clear mind, so thanks guys. Will do some dry firing at home and head back to the range next week.

    Tommy
     
  7. MagBlackhawk

    MagBlackhawk Patriot

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    Tommy,
    Too bad Ruger doesn't have a .22 LR conversion kit for your .45.
    You could get into the mindset of 'it's only a .22' when shooting either one.

    Maybe Ruger's 22/45 would be the next best thing to use as a training aid.

    In my early days of shooting, my .22 rifles helped me with my high power rifle shooting. (Still does to this day).
    Same deal with my .22 Single Six and my .357 Blackhawk shooting.
    When I'm doing accuracy testing with the .357, I shoot a few with the .22 when the blast of the .357 starts to fatigue me, works wonders.
    Just a thought.
     
  8. berettabone

    berettabone In the army now..

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    I used to play a lot of golf in my younger days......3 or 4 times a week. You'd think with all of that play, you would get pretty good. No matter how good I got, when I had something on my mind that was bothering me, I played horrible. When life was good, and the head was clear, I played great. I won't go shooting if my mind is not right. It's kind of a waste of ammo.
     
  9. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    Aw jeez, 'bone, if I could only shoot when my mind is right, I wouldn't get any shooting in.