Ran the Rugers today

Discussion in 'Ruger Center Fire Pistols' started by hodge, Sep 3, 2015.

  1. hodge

    hodge New Member

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    I finally got to my secret range today (been super busy lately), and I took the SR1911 and the AR-556. Both ran perfect, with no issues.
    I put 100 rounds of FMJ through the 1911; it is such a joy to shoot, and it is quickly becoming my favorite handgun.
    I ran 120 rounds through the AR. A member from Sigtalk (which is another great site, full of quality people) gave me a red dot scope for it, which I hadn't messed with yet. I dialed my iron sights in first, then messed around with the red dot. It is way off- I have no idea how much the previous owner may have adjusted it- so I didn't get much accomplished bringing it in. A friend of mine knows much more about them than I do, so he's going to help me.
    I ran the AR first, so that it would have time to cool down while I put rounds through the 1911. It was a great morning.
     
  2. Ernesto

    Ernesto In the army now..

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    Secret range? I got one of those as well. Way out in the sticks far away from civilization. I bring a tarp so it's easy to collect spent shells. Headed out this weekend, prolly take the .410 (with those 000 buckshot) and the Remmington 870 Express I haven't shot yet. And definetely my SR9c which is always with me anyways.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2015

  3. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    Getting away to do some shooting most always is a good day. I am thinking about putting a red dot on my soon to have PT92.
     
  4. hodge

    hodge New Member

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    I live in the Blue Ridge mountains, and have plenty of room to shoot. BUT, my daughter has a horse boarding business, so I can't shoot here. I can get away from the horses, but the noise most certainly would upset the horse owners. So, I go to family land about 5 miles away. It is off the grid, and takes a 4WD to get there. But, it is great because there is privacy, no homes within miles, and the noise won't bother anyone/thing. It takes about 25 minutes to get there from my house, and I start to unwind as soon as I get off the pavement. By the time I get to the clearing (an old house used to stand in the clearing, and there is still a rock fence there), I am relaxed and ready to put some rounds down range. It's a great place to pitch a tent and camp.
    It sure is a blessing. I think a public range could be fun, but I don't like crowds when I'm shooting. I like the privacy and solitude my hidden range.
     
  5. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    "Rock fence", hey? Is that designation common in your neck of the woods? :) Yeah, shooting alone is good. Would be better if my range wasn't next to the state highway. Never know who's gonna drive by.
     
  6. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    Hodge,
    I would trade with you any day of the week. Believe me when I say you don't want to go to a public range. The range I go to is hot, crowded and smokey. The lanes are right next to each other and many times rounds from an adjacent lane will come flying into your lane, sometimes hitting you. What size of SR1911 do you have. I have all 3 of them however my LW Commander is my favorite. It had a 6lbs. pull trigger from the factory and I had a trigger job done one it and had it taken to 4lbs. pull with a hair of pre-travel. I love this pistol and the trigger job made it a superb shooter! Enjoy the pistol and let us know what SR1911 you have. Enjoy your range!!

    Tommy
     
  7. hodge

    hodge New Member

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    Hillman- there are rock fences all through the mountains around here. They are built about 3 foot wide by 4 foot high. They date back 200 years or so, and they are still intact, unless someone dismantles it. I'll get a photo the next time I'm near one. Tommycourt- I have the lightweight commander. I haven't measured the trigger, but I would guess it to be about 4 and a half (comparing it to another 1911 that I had). This SR sure is a keeper, and it is running flawless.

    I found a photo online of a rock wall on the Parkway.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2015
  8. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    :D

    Hah. My question was how common is the term 'rock fence' in your area. There are plenty of those things around here, but they are called stone walls.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2015
  9. hodge

    hodge New Member

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    A lot of folks had them to keep cattle in, and the term rock fence is almost all that I've ever heard.
     
  10. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    What I wouldn't give to have a country side like that!!! In the pics it is soooooo beautiful. Out here we have scrub brush and cactus and nothing but desert. I would love just to sit on the fence and listen to the sounds of nature. What you guys have their is something that is on my bucket list. I would rather shoot the bucket than kick the bucket but right now all I can do is visualize it in my mind when I go to bed. Cherish what you have!!! Bob and Hodge, you both make me envious!

    Tommy
     
  11. DoubleR

    DoubleR Active Member

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    Tommy you can send me your cactus. :D My tortoise would thank you ;) jk lol
    Very beautiful country. I agree
     
  12. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    Depending on weather and season, some imagination may be required to see the beauty in our woods. BTW I have seen the 'Sonoran' desert near Tucson. It was February, too early for the cactus to bloom I guess, but with just a little imagination it was beautiful. My elderly brother loved it, and got too close to a cactus only once.
     
  13. hodge

    hodge New Member

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    Tommycourt, if you get to the East coast, there will be a steaming cup of coffee and a trip to the range waiting for you!
     
  14. Ernesto

    Ernesto In the army now..

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    Tucson is a little scrubby until you hit the far east side and northeast side, mucho better than Phoenix's desolate area. I can also be up in pine trees (and all terrain in between) in a twenty minute drive from my house.
    First two pics are the Santa Catalina Mountains @ 9800ft elevation ( I live near the bottom), third pic is Phoenix see dust storm(habOOb). Where would you like to live? hehehe
     

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    Last edited: Sep 7, 2015
  15. MagBlackhawk

    MagBlackhawk Patriot

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    Ernesto, I looked at the Santa Catalina Mountains on google earth. What direction do you drive from the Santa Catalina Mountains to find pine tress?
    I thought you had to go toward Flagstaff for pines.

    Glad I never saw a dust storm in the year I lived in Phoenix. Temps of 120 were a little tough though.
     
  16. Ernesto

    Ernesto In the army now..

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    I drive up Catalina Hwy, due north. It turns into Mt. Lemmon hwy at the bottom of the mountains. The top is heavily forested with Ponderosa. Theres a ski facility up there with a lift.
    Then to the east there's the Rincon mountains, not quite as high as the Catalinas. Theres no roads up there but lots of pine as well.
     
  17. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    If you have never had to experience a dust storm (haboob) let me give you an example. People who live in snow country are very familiar with "whiteouts" as when I lived in Iowa I got caught in a lot of them. They are so bad that you can't see the hood of your car or truck. Now visualize that with dust and dirt instead of snow and temps. running around 105-110 degrees. You are required to pull over to the side of the road and shut OFF your lights so someone is less likely to run into you. Windshield wipers work the same way that they TRY to remove snow, again except this is dirt. You stay IN your vehicle because regardless of how you hold your head, you will not be able to breath. We have had dust storms as high as 40,000 feet and you can watch in move in with great velocity and quickly overwhelm you. It's a very dangerous time. Out here we call them brown outs. I was caught in one where I was in my 72 GMC truck with no a/c and had to roll up the windows and just sit. Temp was 113 degrees at the time. I pulled over and had to wait for about an hour and then I could barely see, however traffic did start to move. Another pleasant day in the Valley of the Sun.

    Tommy
     
  18. hodge

    hodge New Member

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    I can relate, about 5% worth. No a/c, get caught in a thunderstorm and have to keep the windows rolled up, about 200% humidity...
    Still got your 72? This is a 75, 57,000 original miles, my great uncle had bought it new. When he passed away, his son got it. He had it repainted, a small body lift, and new rims/tires, and then he parked it. He put maybe 200 miles on it in 12 years. I traded labor (new floors in his house) for it- his suggestion. It is as clean as it looks- floor boards are good, no rust in the body, and when I got it, I gave it a Fluid Film treatment. I also keep it off the Winter roads.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2015