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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wishing Ruger would come out with an American Scout Rifle. Make MSRP about half of what the Ruger Gunsite Scout is. Akin to the price difference between the Hawkeye and American Rifle. The American Ranch is already 80% there, just add sights and a forward mounted rail.The Ranch is a short action and should handle and should handle the 308 just fine.

While we are at it, chamber it in the same rounds that the Gunsite Scout is chambered for, the 223, 6.5 Creedmore, 308, and 450 Bushmaster, but add a couple of more, the 7mm-08 and 243 Winchester. The 6mm Creedmore is worth a look too. The 2 Creedmore cartridges would need a 18" barrel though I think.
 

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Nice wish list
 

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That is one for the wishlist! The mossberg mvp rifles are pretty good scout rifles if you are looking for one cheaper than the Ruger. The mossberg’s use ar 10 or 15 pattern mags as well. The only think I didn’t like about my gunsight scout was the magazines.

I fully agree about the calibers as well. I really wish the 7mm-08 would have taken off more. It is a really good cartridge and would be great in a scout rifle!
 

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That is one for the wishlist! The mossberg mvp rifles are pretty good scout rifles if you are looking for one cheaper than the Ruger. The mossberg’s use ar 10 or 15 pattern mags as well. The only think I didn’t like about my gunsight scout was the magazines.

I fully agree about the calibers as well. I really wish the 7mm-08 would have taken off more. It is a really good cartridge and would be great in a scout rifle!
I agree. The 7mm-08 is an excellent cartridge.
 

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Ruger should bring back the modek 77 in 6.5 Swede...........it would out perform any 6.5 Creedmoor out there. I didn't drink that kool-aid!!!
Agreed. The 6.5 Swede barrels and chambers have a longer lifespan as well! I don’t think we will ever see that though. Too many people would rather have the 6.5 Creedmoor.
 

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Wishing Ruger would come out with an American Scout Rifle. Make MSRP about half of what the Ruger Gunsite Scout is. Akin to the price difference between the Hawkeye and American Rifle. The American Ranch is already 80% there, just add sights and a forward mounted rail.The Ranch is a short action and should handle and should handle the 308 just fine.

While we are at it, chamber it in the same rounds that the Gunsite Scout is chambered for, the 223, 6.5 Creedmore, 308, and 450 Bushmaster, but add a couple of more, the 7mm-08 and 243 Winchester. The 6mm Creedmore is worth a look too. The 2 Creedmore cartridges would need a 18" barrel though I think.
Just out of curiosity...what's your use case for a scout rifle? Or, more accurately, for the set of features that characterizes a scout rifle?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Agreed. The 6.5 Swede barrels and chambers have a longer lifespan as well! I don’t think we will ever see that though. Too many people would rather have the 6.5 Creedmoor.
The Swede is a fine cartridge and has proven itself. The one thing it will not do is stabilize the long skinny ELD bullets though.
 

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The Swede is a fine cartridge and has proven itself. The one thing it will not do is stabilize the long skinny ELD bullets though.
Interesting. Is that with surplus 1-7.8 and 1-8 twist barrels as well? I have never used ELD bullets with a 6.5X55, mostly just SMK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Interesting. Is that with surplus 1-7.8 and 1-8 twist barrels as well? I have never used ELD bullets with a 6.5X55, mostly just SMK.
I mis spoke, the ELD bullets will not fit the magazine of the Swede.
 

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The American Ranch Rifle, could very easily fit the bill of a "budget" Scout Rifle. I have one in .223/5.56, and the other in 7.62x39mm. The latter I bought to justify all the Russian ammo I still had on hand, after selling my AK.

Like you said, just needs to be set up for a LER scope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just out of curiosity...what's your use case for a scout rifle? Or, more accurately, for the set of features that characterizes a scout rifle?
It's an old eyes thing I think. That and getting injured by a hog I did not see. I need a scope. I can not see irons well, exception being peeps, and dot sights dont work well because of astigmatism.

I took a bubba'ed M44 Mosin and turned it into a psuedo scout and found it just worked for me, basically because I can shoot it with both eyes open and retain my peripheral vision. Something I can not do with a conventional mounted scope. Once bitten, twice shy.

Plus an American Scout Rifle would look much better than my Mosin!
20180518_170304.jpg
 

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It's an old eyes thing I think. That and getting injured by a hog I did not see.
Ouch. I had a boar charge me once after I shot one of his buddies. Luckily I was barely able to chamber another round and take a shot at him in time to scare him off (hit the dirt in front of him, I was in such a rush to shoot). That's one of the things that convinced me to start using my AR-15 for hog hunts instead of a bolt gun. It turns out that they're pretty much ideal for the task.

I need a scope. I can not see irons well, exception being peeps, and dot sights dont work well because of astigmatism.
I hear you. My vision has been going downhill for the past few years as well. I can still use red dots, but I don't know for how long that will last.

I took a bubba'ed M44 Mosin and turned it into a psuedo scout and found it just worked for me, basically because I can shoot it with both eyes open and retain my peripheral vision. Something I can not do with a conventional mounted scope. Once bitten, twice shy.

Plus an American Scout Rifle would look much better than my Mosin!
View attachment 11768
I don't know. I think that Mosin would look pretty good if you were either able to find an orphaned M44 stock, or just find a decent wood laminate replacement from a stock vendor...which would be a lot cheaper than a new scout rifle.

I actually enjoy deer hunting with my 91/30. Here's a little spike I took last season with it:

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I normally use an AR15. I like a fast monolithic bullet. Barnes TSX. A hit with one in the boiler room and the pig is DRT. It needs to be running close to 3000 for though. I personally believe pigs are especially subject to hydrostatic shock.

I had an AR when the pig got me, I didn't see it until it was too late. The dogs had them stirred up and I was watching another one.
 

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Ouch. I had a boar charge me once after I shot one of his buddies. Luckily I was barely able to chamber another round and take a shot at him in time to scare him off (hit the dirt in front of him, I was in such a rush to shoot). That's one of the things that convinced me to start using my AR-15 for hog hunts instead of a bolt gun. It turns out that they're pretty much ideal for the task.



I hear you. My vision has been going downhill for the past few years as well. I can still use red dots, but I don't know for how long that will last.



I don't know. I think that Mosin would look pretty good if you were either able to find an orphaned M44 stock, or just find a decent wood laminate replacement from a stock vendor...which would be a lot cheaper than a new scout rifle.

I actually enjoy deer hunting with my 91/30. Here's a little spike I took last season with it:

Nice deer...and Mosin! My 91/30 is in excellent shape as well, but have not used it to hunt with though.
 

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Nice deer...and Mosin! My 91/30 is in excellent shape as well, but have not used it to hunt with though.
Thanks. The condition of 91/30 barrels is kind of hit-or-miss. And even if you have one that's in good shape the exact bore diameters are not precisely consistent from factory to factory, or even from one production run to another. My 91/30 (an ordinary '43 Izhevsk refurb) was a Christmas gift from my son. Fortunately he took the time to closely inspect all of the rifles that the store had in stock and chose the one that was in the best condition. It shoots OK with factory ammo, but not accurately for hunting at ranges of 100+ yds. So I measured the actual bore diameter (both lands and grooves) by bore-slugging it with a lead sinker from my tackle box. It turned out to be just a fraction of a hair over a .312" bore rather than than the nominal .308" (7.62mm) that they're supposed to be. So I worked up some hand loads using 7.62x54R brass and some 150 gr. Hornady 7.7 Japanese spire-point bullets (which are .312" in diameter) and was able to get one of them consistently delivering ~1.25" groups at 100 yds. Not impressive by modern standards, but not bad for a mass-produced-by-the-trainload, refurbished commie rifle from 1943. And I only use it for deer hunting in areas where I won't be getting any long shots. In more open areas I take my Savage 111 in .30-06.
 

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Thanks. The condition of 91/30 barrels is kind of hit-or-miss. And even if you have one that's in good shape the exact bore diameters are not precisely consistent from factory to factory, or even from one production run to another. My 91/30 (an ordinary '43 Izhevsk refurb) was a Christmas gift from my son. Fortunately he took the time to closely inspect all of the rifles that the store had in stock and chose the one that was in the best condition. It shoots OK with factory ammo, but not accurately for hunting at ranges of 100+ yds. So I measured the actual boar diameter (both lands and grooves) by bore-slugging it with a lead sinker from my tackle box. It turned out to be just a fraction of a hair over a .312" bore rather than than the nominal .308" (7.62mm) that they're supposed to be. So I worked up some hand loads using 7.62x54R brass and some 150 gr. Hornady 7.7 Japanese spire-point bullets (which are .312" in diameter) and was able to get one of them consistently delivering ~1.25" groups at 100 yds. Not impressive by modern standards, but not bad for mass-produced-by-the-trainload, refurbished commie rifle from 1943. And I only use it for deer hunting in areas where I won't be getting any long shots. In more open areas I take my Savage 111 in .30-06.
Hmmmm....interesting. I have a 1941 Nagoya Type 99 Arisaka, with the mum, that runs the 7.7 Jap round. My Mosin is a 1943 Izzy as well, and it groups not too shabby with Barnaul 174 grain loads. On a rifle rest, and all the planets come into alignment, I was getting around 1.75 MOA at 100 yards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
My best Mosin is a Chinese T53. It has a shiny bore that likes the Sierra .311 pro hunters and the Lee .312-185-1R. the stock was orrible though and I dropped it in a Russian M44 stock. It has no collector value anyway what with the big gaudy import stamp on the receiver.

Then I have the "Mosin Psuedo Scout" I posted earlier. T38 Arisaka that my wife's uncle brought back from Japan in WWII. It's interesting in that is was not an army rifle, but a school rifle. It's sporterized though. It was his hunting brifle for the rest of his life. A Springfield 1895 carbine, Spanish FR8 and a 1873 Springfield carbine round out my milsurp collection.

Funny story about the Springfield. When I found it I did not have the cash on hand in my fun money account and had to dip into the household funds. The wife asked why I wanted to spend so much on a rifle. I told her history, it's the same rifle that Custer and the 7th Calvary had at the Little Big Horn. Her response? Then why do you want it, it did not do them any good!
 
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