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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally got out to shoot the new LC9s. Feeling a lot more comfortable with it. Took a few shots to get in the groove with it. ImageUploadedByRuger Forum1492295483.539014.jpg
Beautiful day, 75 degrees with the wind out of the southwest at 15 mph. Shot some perfecta 115 gr. FMJ. And some gold dot HP. No issues. Love the trigger. So much better than my Shield. The gun definitely shoots better than I do. Every time I made an adjustment the group would stay consistent.
 

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Yep looks like my shooting. I can't hardly hit the eye but my shots are mostly consistent except for a zinger now and again.
I seem to have my pulling this way and that down pretty consistent. I just wonder if point and shoot might give me better results. My second finger just isn't near as strong though.

My bowling was like my shooting....I kept doing the same things over and over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
May try point and shoot next time. While dry firing it seemed to point really well. Practice, practice.
 

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This is a long winded but hopefully helpful post about the issue. I had the same problem but got past it. Here is the story.

I carried a full size 9mm until my two battered rotator cuffs (beyond surgical repair) plus my arthritis of the base thumb joint in each hand just made it impossible for me to maintain accuracy. I went to a Lc9 because it felt good in the hand, and I could manage the trigger deficiency. I went to the Lc9s just after it became available, I have put a couple thousand 115g FMJ rounds through it.

Shooting the original Lc9 I had accuracy problems connected to the trigger and the size/weight. I put a green laser on it to try to improve. It got worse. The green dot moved around so much I was not certain where I was going to hit.

I spent time analyzing the problem. I found that I was more accurate in Weaver vs. Isosceles stance because the Weaver took some stress off my shoulders. I found the recoil in Isosceles was a problem that I corrected by slightly bending at the elbow, which reduces the effect of recoil through the arms to the shoulders. Things got better that way, but they were not good enough. So I considered by hand grip. I am RH dominant but I was pulling to the left. I considered my LH thumb position. it was classic and my left thumb rested on the lower just below the slide with my right thumb resting on it. I decided to lower my left thumb to just about trier guard position and let the right thumb rest on it. It was still very isometric, but just felt better to me.

I'm tried it at the range, and the pull to the left was gone. I have no idea why and I do not care. It worked. I suspect it had something to do with the size of the gun, but I am not sure of that. All I know is it worked and still works.

I also went exclusively to what I was taught in the Corps. Acquire the target, and get your front sight on it. Quickly align the rear sight using the needed motion. Then shoot. Do not try to perfect that aim because all it will do is get worse as you try. Acquire, front, rear, bang.

I print my own targets. The bullseye is a a strip that is 6 x 2 inches. It is about the size of an average human breastbone. Shoot the the breast bone with a 9mm at 25 feet and you will shatter the bone sending fragments at the heart, lungs, carotid artery and vena cava, the artery and vein that gets blood to and from the brain. If the bullet passes straight back it hitsn the spinal column. If it deflects it is near the heart and lungs. So I have a restricted target area aim point. I do not care about traditional bullseyes. I shotguns for maximum effect not score. I can reliably hit it a 25 feet. I think that is due to hand grip and to the modified Isosceles stance. When I shoot Weaver I do better because the stance offers more arm stability. Today I practice getting into that stance quickly. It could save my life.
 

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Tommycourt
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By the looks of it, you may be jerking the trigger especially if it's a new pistol. That's not out of the realm of possibility. Any time you get a new gun, getting used to the trigger takes some time. How well I know. I am somewhat like Allen as arthritis has gotten to my shoulders so I use a modified Weaver stance (feet at a 45 degree angle) and I bend my arms to help absorb part of the recoil. Another thing that can affect hitting at 7 o'clock is you might be not holding the gun or locking the wrist with the weak hand. When I go to the range I have to remind myself to hold my left hand a little (just a smidgen) tighter with my weak thumb. I don't think there is anything to worry about, it's just takes practice and patience. I try to shoot weekly but if I miss a week, then I have to go back to the basics about my grip. Good luck and keep on practicing!!!

Tommy
 
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