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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Some are saying it is more of an Redhawk than a GP100.
I think you just showed that Ruger just revamped the Redhawk 357 magnum for the new Super.
 

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It’s definitely a beautiful gun. Something that pricey, I’d just as well get the Redhawk in .44 for that steep price. The Redhawk in .357 is also an awesome firearm. By the way, the Super GP-100 is an upgrade from the Match Champion GP-100 and mostly for competition. I wonder how much better it is from the standard GP-100, which is what I have.
The Super uses the action of the Redhawk for a spring lock in order for better double action fireing, but is it still a Bad Ass and beautiful GP-100. Something I can't squeeze my wallet hard enough for and if I save up for it, I'll find something better to spend my money on. This is good for someone that is a competitive shooter and with spare cash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
On the S&W forum many have the opinion the gun is flat out ugly. I guess because of the barrel shroud on it.
I don't think it is ugly but different to say the least.
I had a Match Champion and I couldn't hit squat with it. Maybe it just didn't fit my hand to trigger right. My S&W 627-5 and Colt Python both left the Match Champion anything but the champion. I really thought the MC was a beautiful gun but beauty doesn't put the bullet where it needs to go. I sold it.
 

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It looks nice, clean and classic Ruger lines. Also looks heavy. And it only has 2 more shots than my decades old Speed Six. A fixed sight 2.75" round butt, Security Six for all ya young guys who don't know what a Speed Six is. Guess if ya can handle the size and weight, you could try to conceal carry it. Otherwise, it is a good home defense gun, holstered trail gun, or paper puncher if ya happened to get an accurate one.

That's one thing ya find with revolvers, no matter how nice they are. Some will shoot one hole groups all day with most ammo ya put in them. Others shoot shotgun like patterns even when ya put them in a bench vice or sand bags. If ya have a good one from the start, hang onto it. Otherwise, it will be a frustrating task to find which brand of ammo shoots best for that gun and some will not shoot well with anything.

Reasons for that. Most common is the cylinder and forcing cone aignment. Even if it is just slightly off to one side, a bullet will drag on one side of the forcing cone enough to where it will be slightly distorted. It will enter the rifling at an angle and will not be concentric with the bore. Some chambers may be far enough outta line with the bore that lead or copper jacket material can be shaved off. You may be able to check the forcing cone area on a bad shooting revolver by visually inspecting the forcing cone and frame area on the gun. Sometimes you can see more residue or even metal on the side of the gun where the bullet is off center. This problem can be corrected by taking metal off the forcing cone on the side where the bullet is off center and taper it into the rifilng. Yeah, it takes some skill with a Dremel tool. Probably best left to the experienced. Too much metal will make it weak. I have been able to move the bullet strikes on a revolver as much as 2" closer to center and cutting the group size in half.

Another weird condition is where one or more chambers shoot to one point of aim and the others shott to another. This can also be borrected by the above method.

Irregular "shotgun patterns can be traced to one of two thuings. The chamber openings on the cylinder are smaller than the rifing lands in the barrel. Like a revolvr with a barrel size of .357 yo 358 and the chamber openings are at a tight .355 to .356. Even a bullet of .358 will be swedged down to the smaller caliber before it enters the larger bore. So, less contact with the rifling at high speed will keep the bullet from spinning at the right twist rate and it will not stabilize. Erratec patterns will result. Ususally takes a micrometer to measure the chamber mouths and barrel or slugs fired through it. Opening the chamber mouths to ther correct size will correct the distortion to the bullet.

The other is a problem with a tight place in the bore. This will do much the same thiung as tight chambers. Bullets get squeezed down as they pass through it causing poor contact with the rifing from that point forward. One way to check a barrel is to run tight patches through it on a cleaning rod. You should be able to feel a tight area. One way to rresolve this is to run a slug cast over a cleaning jag through the bore with valve gringing compound on it. Yeah, ya gotta have the skill to do this slug casting in the part of the bore that is a bit larger without burining yourself with hot lead, getting the slug and jag stuck in the bore, and ruining your revolver.

So, inow you know why a lot of hith dollar or even cheap revolvers do not perform as well as the few "magic" ones that are out there. Takes some skill to correct the problems. That is why I hardly ever buy a new gun, especially a revolver. Guess if ya like to send it back to the factory till they get it right, well more power to ya. Ill, just keep buying the used ones for less. Most of the time, the revolvers just get looked at cause they have the beauty that most autos don't have. So I really don't shoot mosts of them. Don't really matter if they don't shoot well.
 

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Guess if ya like to send it back to the factory till they get it right, well more power to ya.
All good information in that post I highlighted that quote because it made me think of how many are having to send their revolvers back to S&W for canted barrels. We are talking high dollar revolvers here. Been following a guy on YouTube and every time he buys a new S&W revolver he has to send it in, funny thing is he doesn't seem to be all that bothered by it. I guess because he has so many guns.

He had one that had a titanium cylinder that had to be replaced because of cylinder erosion from the ammo he was using. And he was only shooting factory ammo. That gun cost over $1k. Bottom line for me is they don't give a s--t, they know there are enough faithful out here who will swear by them.

I suppose like most things people get attached emotionally because they want to feel they made a good buy. I'm guessing as well it's why S&W now offers a lifetime warranty.
They must know their guns are a mess.

Ruger has never tried to claim their revolvers are heirloom quality or are given that impression by the gun community. You spend enough time reading around on the forums and you'll discover like I did most of that supposed quality never leaves the safe. I saw a lot of that bullshit when I was member of the S&W forum before I got the boot.

Any gun I buy is a working gun and a range gun.
 

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I have a buddyu that has quite a few of those unfired safe queens. He mifht rake one out and shoot it at some point after he gets it. Sometimes it takes months or years. He doesn't much care if it is that accurate. He uaually expects them to work. If they do, he will put them away and probably never shot them again.

pHe will send back the Rugers he buys, ususally the big ssingle actions if they have a problem of some kind cause he will shoot those at times.
 
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