Magpul fore grip recommendation?

Discussion in 'Ruger Rifle Forum' started by ron4735, Apr 13, 2020.

  1. ron4735

    ron4735 New Member

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    First time rifle owner of Ruger 9mm PC carbine model #19115. 1) Which Magpul fore grip would you choose...AFG or AFG-2? I have researched the specs of both and like them both. 2) which Magpul sling, attachment hardware for this rifle? I am confused by all the combinations on Magpul website & LGS was of little assistance. Will use rifle on indoor & outdoor ranges, but |purchased as a bedroom self-defense weapon. Thanks in advance to all who respond. I appreciate ya!1
     
  2. DParker

    DParker Active Member

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    I suppose the way to approach any recommendations is to first establish what it is you want these accessories for. Ignoring the fact that I find the gun in question to be an odd choice for a home defense firearm, a sling serves no purpose on such a weapon. In fact it would serve to only get in the way when trying to deploy the weapon in a home defense scenario, and doesn't do anything for you at a shooting range either. So what would the sling be for?

    I would also ask why a foregrip, and an angled one in particular?
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2020

  3. ron4735

    ron4735 New Member

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    I would use the 2-point sling for transport only on and around outdoor range. It would be detached when used as a bedroom self defense weapon. The Magpul M-LOK hand grip is comfortable as is for range use without a fore grip of any kind. Just thought it would be more stable with a fore grip. I may need to rethink my assumptions. Thanks for your candid input....appreciated!
     
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  4. DParker

    DParker Active Member

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    My approach to the issue would be start with some reflection on why I (well, you) chose a carbine for a bedroom gun. I say this because in most homes a long gun is a relatively unwieldy weapon (compared to a handgun). Their length combined with the fact that you may need to negotiate narrow doorways, hallways, etc means that extra attention must be paid to avoiding problems like burying the muzzle in a wall or doorjamb. This adds an essential element to your training/practice regime to ensure that such avoidance becomes muscle memory and saves you from making such an error under the intense pressure of a home invasion scenario.

    So think about the ways in which you'll need to hold and carry your carbine, as well as bring it to bear in such a situation. Clear the weapon, double checking each step of that process. Then practice getting out of bed and retrieving the gun from wherever it will be kept. Then, holding the carbine at low-ready, try moving quickly and quietly to and through the bedroom door and into a position - or multiple positions - where you think you would be most likely to need to engage a threat. Then quickly raise the gun to high-ready and prepare to fire at the intruder. Take note of any potential obstacles to carrying all this out in a quick, efficient and error-free manner. How comfortable and secure was your grip on and control of the weapon? What modifications to the gun and/or your handling of it seem like they would improve the process? This should go a long way toward answering your questions, or perhaps even have you rethinking the suitability of that weapon to the intended task.

    Also, I note you don't mention plans to mount a light on the carbine. This should be one of, if not the first accessories you should plan on for a things-that-go-bump-in-the-night gun.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2020