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Tommycourt
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just wondered if anyone else lubes their pistol rounds before resizing them. Dillon makes a lube that you spray very lightly on your brass before you resize the casing. I use it even though I have carbide dies. An 8 oz. bottle goes a long ways. I lay the rounds on a cookie sheet (pan) and give them a light coating and then I resize and deprime. With carbide dies it's not necessary however I have found that sometimes the die accepts the brass a little easier and the lube does nothing to harm the brass. After about a thousand rounds I then clean my dies and my cookie sheet, depending on how much walnut bits I have after tumbling. I do this with all my .45 loads.

Tommy
 

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I've always used carbide dies for my pistol loads and have never bothered lubing 'em. But that's good to know about the spray lube. Does it work for rifle brass on steel dies?
 

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I actually have an experiment ongoing that is testing case lubing vs dry on my handgun loads.

I have 30 45acp cases separate from all others that were all once fired and all same headstamp and manufacture batch. 15 that I lube every time and 15 that I do not lube at all

I shoot them each time that I am at the range and make sure I collect each set after firing to keep them all and together.

I am on the 3rd reload of each set and I plan to take case measurements and keep track every 3 or so uses to see if there are any differences/changes in the dimensions and wear in comparison to each other (each set).

If anyone likes, I will report the results of my experiment once I get enough uses in to make useful data.

Doc
 

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Tommycourt
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Savage,

The lube is made of lanolin and isopropol alcohol so I can't see where it could damage anything metallic. When I spray it on I just spray a very light mist and then let it set for a few moments before I start resizing. Since you are doing rifle you usually have to pre-lube anyway, at least I did when I was reloading 7mm magnum so in answer to your question, no I don't think it will hurt. The pre-lube is only about $10.00 so if you don't use it for rifle, use it on your pistol brass. Hope this helps.

Doc, I would like to see what your results are when you are done. I have some .45 brass that I have loaded over 15 times and never had problems however I never load hot rounds. I keep my powder charge pretty much in the middle of the loading guide. When I go to prime, I check all my rounds for cracks or bulges or any time of damage prior to priming.

Tommy
 

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Patriot
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Hey Doc, it will be interesting to see what you come up with on that.

I use carbide dies so I don't Have to use case lube. I hate messing with that stuff when loading rifle ammo.
 

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Yeah , I have the carbide dies too.

The experiment isn't too see if the lube does any harm. I don't see how that is possible.

I'm just a curious guy and I want to see if it has any benefit at all when using in conjunction with carbide dies.

I can use anywhere from 150 to 300 rounds a range visit depending on how many guns I take, so if I find that it helps to lengthen case life, I might make the effort to lube.

Doc
 

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^yeah, I'll be interested to know what you find out. Might try cutting a case down the middle to see you the case walls have thinned more or less.
ImageUploadedByRuger Forum1474904880.898858.jpg
 

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Lubing cases for carbide dies is a communist plot, I'm pretty sure.
 

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I started loading on a turret press a few years ago. Before then I had never used bullet lube with any carbide dies. Although the turret press ran fine without lubing the cases, I decided to lube the cases to see if there was a difference.

I hit the cases with a spray of Hornady One Shot and started loading. There was a noticeable difference in the ease of working the press. I loaded 1000 9mm that morning in slightly less than 4 hours. I felt that was a sufficient test, and while I do not always lube my cases now when reloading, but usually I do.
 

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I use a Rock Chucker press. The leverage is such that 9mm,40S&W and 45 auto put up very little resistance. The revolver cases are long enough to be noticeable. I have One Shot, for rifle cases (and it works great for swaging bullets). Gotta try it on 44 Mag cases.
 

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I use a Rock Chucker press. The leverage is such that 9mm,40S&W and 45 auto put up very little resistance. The revolver cases are long enough to be noticeable. I have One Shot, for rifle cases (and it works great for swaging bullets). Gotta try it on 44 Mag cases.
I load handgun rounds, and some rifle rounds, on a Lee Classic Cast Turret. It's a stout press too. It wasn't the resistance that sold me, but rather that the press somehow ran smoother.

I have a RCBS Jr 2 and a RCBS Jr 3 for the larger rifle cases. Honestly don't remember trying one shot on them. I always use RCBS lube and a lube pad. Guess I need to try the spray lube next time. :eek:
 

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Lubricating helps , I'm all for making things easier on myself and equipment. If you ever stick a case in a steel die you will become fanatical about lubing after that.
I mix Lee Case Sizing Lube with alcohol and apply with a spray bottle. It's a wax so non greasy and water soluable for easy wipe off, I like it best of everything I've tried .
Gary
 
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