Lee anniversary kit.

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by Dreamthief, Apr 25, 2017.

  1. Dreamthief

    Dreamthief GP100 Gunslinger

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    Hey guys. I'm wanting to get into reloading. I purchased a Lee anniversary kit and some other things about a year ago and got busy. I'm ready to get into it soon and would like to get organized. If I post pics of what I have can you guys help me fill in the blanks?
     
  2. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    There are quite a few here that can help you getting started and then some. I am a newbe to reloading also and I have the Lee turret press kit.

    Get a couple books on reloading that also have powder loads and other data.

    I bought an electric scales. 38 spl three die set. A tumbler for cleaning casings. Lizard bedding from Petco for cleaning medium. Recently bought another turret plate to set up for 44 special rounds. A three die set 44 spl. A bullet puller. One pound of powder to get started. 1000 small primers at first and recently 1000 large primers for handguns and two more pounds of powder.

    You definitely don't want any distractions while you are reloading.
     

  3. SavageGuy

    SavageGuy Active Member

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    Make sure that you've got a manual. Read it thoroughly. Once you've finished, read it again. ABSOLUTELY, UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES, SHOULD YOU EVER DEVIATE FROM YOUR MANUEL!!
    Stay within the published data and always start at the suggested starting load.

    If you tell us what you have, we'll tell ya what you need.
     
  4. greg_r

    greg_r Well-Known Member

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    The annaversary kit is a good one. My BIL has been loading on the Challenger press longer than I have been married - both, press and marriage still going strong! :D Don't know what extras you bought, but a set of dies, case length gauge, and a shell holder. ( Comes with Lee dies ). I think a set of measuring calipers are a must. I can show you several who reload perfectly safe rounds, use a factory round to set up your dies, but hey, you can buy a set of calipers for as little as $10. Personally I make dummy rounds to use for setting up my dies.

    Get a few manuals. The ABC's of Reloading is a very good one. Lee's Modern Reloading is another. I also like the Lyman - lots of cast data, and I keep the Speer manual as well. Every year Hodgdon comes out with a reloading magazine, I buy those also. Can't have enough resources or knowledge.
     
  5. Dreamthief

    Dreamthief GP100 Gunslinger

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    I have the kit itself and what came with it, the Hornady reloading book, some primers, some bullets, and of course I have my brass. I can't remember if the kit had a case trimmer or if I picked one up or not. I still need to get powder and dies, but am not sure where to find them. I went to academy sports to try to find some and they had everything but those. I plan on reloading 30-06, .357/.38, .45acp, and 7.62x39 (hunting rounds only as I use the wolf for target shooting etc) I'll post what I have here soon. I'm moving out of the city and have everything up in the air right now. I just thought I'd test the waters and see. I wish I had someone close I could sit down with and watch them reload for awhile.
     
  6. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    Reloading isn't as difficult as we think it is. Follow the directions for setting up each die that comes with the reloading die set. Most important thing is getting the type of powder within the limits for the caliber and bullet used.

    My first mistake was due to not crimping the casing even though the bullet manufacturer said not to. Squib followed that mistake.
    Set the expander/powder die to deep causing the press to hang up.

    About the time you think this is so simple a monkey could do it that's when your concentration could lead to a mistake like a double charge of powder for example. If something doesn't feel right when pulling the handle then stop. If you got distracted for a second then you better stop and check that step before continuing. Been there done that!

    Google gun bullet reloading supplies for your nearest city and that will be where to find the loading supplies such as the die set, bullets, powder, and etc. I found bullets much cheaper online than at my local reloading supply store. Missouri Bullets for example. Powder and primers online the haz mat charges can cause costs to end up about the same or even more than buying locally at your supply store.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2017
  7. gwpercle

    gwpercle Member

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    Try and find a local reloading and supply shop close by. Powder and primers are much cheaper without the hazmat fee's and usually the sales people know something about reloading and you can get advice...this is not always the case but they might be able to help you.
    Reloading isn't complicated but can be tedious in the details. Get several reloading manuals , ABC's of reloading is great for the new reloader. Lead bullets ? Get the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook. Lyman's regular manual , Speer , Hornady and Lee would cover a lot of territory.
    Stay away from maximum loads for now....pushing envelopes can come later. Cross reference all loads with other manuals just to be sure . If I or anyone else gives you a load....make sure it's not over max and listed in a published source.
    Watch powder charging , setting a scale , weighing powder...make sure it's right. My first blunder was weighing 10.5 grains on a scale......I actually had it set on 15....make sure you can read and set your scale properly.
    Watch diligently for... no powder in a case and a double charge in a case , these are the most common causes of a mishap.
    Gary
     
  8. SavageGuy

    SavageGuy Active Member

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    +1 on the calipers. I use them all the time. I'd recommend starting with .38/357 as that is a fairly sure cartridge to load for. Once you've got that down move on to the others.
     
  9. MagBlackhawk

    MagBlackhawk Patriot

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    Two posts have mentioned getting the ABC's of reloading.
    I agree, get it along with a bunch of reloading manuals and anything else you can find on the subject.

    You can also find reloading data online from the powder manufacturers.

    Study ALL of the data, then decide on your starting loads.


    :usa:
     
  10. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    When working up a new load I look at both the Hornady 9th and the Lyman 49th editions. I use several Hornady bullets, so their manual is a good fit - except when they didn't test the powder I want to use. Lyman tested a lot of powders for their manual.

    I distrust calipers, because I've had a couple of them go out of whack. So I have a set of O.D. micrometers for up to 4 inches.

    38 Special is a good round to start with, because it gets you used to the visual check of powder charge before seating the bullet - every round. No squibs for this child.
     
  11. silveradoman59

    silveradoman59 Member

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    I see a lot of these posts talk about preventing double charges. In order to avoid a double charge I bought four loading blocks and always use at least two. Prime the case and bell the mouth first and place each one in a loading block after I bell the mouth. Next I charge the case (after getting everything set up and checking it first) and place it in the other loading block. I do each step on 50 cases at a time. (Loading blocks hold 50 cases) Next I put a bullet in the case and seat the bullet placing the rounds into the empty loading block, next step I crimp and put the finished rounds in an ammo box. I do 50 at a time without distractions or stopping so I don't take a chance on forgetting where I am in the process.
     
  12. SavageGuy

    SavageGuy Active Member

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    +1 on using multiple loading blocks

    A little trick I use to avoid a double charge: after flaring and priming, I put the cases back into the loading block headstamp up. So, when I go to charge the case, the cases are upside down and after I charge them they're right side up. Ta da! No double charge.
     
  13. greg_r

    greg_r Well-Known Member

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    One of the best ways to prevent a double charge, and one of the best ways to get a good performing powder for a particular cartridge is to study the powders that are in the burning rate range for the cartridge you are loading for and pick a powder that will nearly fill the case.

    One of the best examples I can give is one of my favorite cartridges, 45 Colt. Attached is a load chart from Nosler. I chose that because Nosler shows load density. My favorite powder for the cartridge is IMR 4227. A look at the chart shows a loading density that ranges from 79% to 84%. A double charge will overflow the case, and I am getting near top velocity with safe pressures using this powder.

    As a comparison, look at the Winchester 231 data. It shows a loading density of 35% to 41%. There is room for a double charge and a little more. Plus the velocity is some 60 fps slower.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. greg_r

    greg_r Well-Known Member

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    Just for comparison and because the OP is considering loading for it, the Nosler data for the 38 Special. The 38 Special and the 45 Colt have this in common. They were designed for black powder. The case is much larger than needed for smokeless powders. Some powders in 38 Special leave enough room for a triple charge! Bullseye is the powder most associated with the 38 Special powder.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    The 45 Colt (SAA) chart shows loadings for Blue Dot. The max load (11.4gr) listed appears in the Lee Modern Reloading 2nd Edition as the starting load (13gr is the listed max load). Lee uses powder company loading data.

    I'm sticking this in the thread not to hijack it, but as a reminder that reloading manuals are often not in precise agreement - and that Blue Dot is one of the powders that may have pressure issues with reduced loads. we need to pay attention when working up loads with new-to-us powders.
     
  16. MagBlackhawk

    MagBlackhawk Patriot

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    That ^ ^ is why I said........

    When I started "rolling my own" I studied every manual on the market at the time.
    Almost none of the manuals agreed on starting or max loads.
    Of course they were all probably using different components ... so there is that.
    I think of the data as a guide only, not as an absolute regardless of the components used.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2017
  17. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture New Member

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    I make my own sixty round loading blocks, and load fifty rounds at a time. This leaves an empty row between those you've worked in that stage, and the ones you haven't.
     
  18. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    I have the Lee turret press and if using the turret plate rotating shaft there shouldn't be any double charges. Isn't the Lee anniversary a turret press?
     
  19. greg_r

    greg_r Well-Known Member

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    The annaversary kit uses the Challenger single stage press.
     
  20. silveradoman59

    silveradoman59 Member

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    I have been using the Lee Anniversary kit for years now with no problems. I would have gotten a turret press kit by now but I don't need to load in those amounts quickly. AS a long time user of the Lee kit these are the things I needed right off. (Disregard any of these things you already have.)
    1. Lee Anniversary Press Kit
    2 .Modern Reloading Second Edition reloading manual
    3. Digital Caliper
    4. 1 Set of dies for each caliber I reload
    5. Lee case length gauges for each cal.
    6. Digital scale 0-700 grains
    7. All components for all calibers
    8. Tumbler and media for cleaning
    9. MTM type Ammo Boxes for finished ammo
    10. I suggest buying some military ammo boxes for storage
    Read the info sections of the manual at least twice.( I always get more the second time than the first) Once you have finished it a second time use it. Load about 5 rounds with the start load and test fire them. At this point you have to decide if the load is what you're looking for. Only you can decide which load is the one that works for your purpose. Later you might want to buy a chronograph to find your velocity. I don't have one I go by report and felt recoil, if you are loading for a semi-auto find a load that cycles the action, then work on the felt recoil. As soon as you can afford to, buy at least one more manual. I actually have four counting my Lyman Lead bullet manual. Above all, pay close attention to what you're doing when reloading. Keep coming to forums like this one for any info you need and enjoy the addiction.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017