I can see it clearly now! But can I hit it?

Discussion in 'General Firearms Forum' started by conservative, Dec 19, 2016.

  1. conservative

    conservative New Member

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    Finally received my carry permit! so I Was in some gun stores today looking at guns and noticed that on white three dot sights and hi point's red and yellow sights it is hard for me to focus. My eyes tend to jump because of spots in my field of vision . Because of This is , I didn't play baseball much as a kid because I could not clearly see on what line the ball was coming. So I would swing and hit air all the time. So the long and short of the thing is that now I am trying to figure a way to overcome or avoid this and still be able to shoot. Is there a specific sight color or design that in general is easier to see.
     
  2. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    What you need to do is to train your eyes! Close 1 eye and hold up your first finger and then point it at an object on the wall. Then close that eye, use the other eye and hold up your finger to the same spot and see where it points. You will find that it will be completely off of where you pointed your first finger at. You need to practice this so you have an idea of which eye is the dominant eye and which hand you will use to hold your pistol deciding which is the dominant hand. In other words, you are trying to figure out which hand is best to use to hold the pistol. Then you need to learn how to hold the pistol with both hands properly. Don't worry about what color of sight you are going to use until you find out which hand you are going to use. This takes practice! You are getting the cart ahead of the horse again. You also stated that they wanted $50.00 for range training. I would shop around and look at different ranges as most of them rent guns and have a range safety officer to help and they don't charge. Explain to them you are a new shooter and are just in the learning stages. You will probably have to buy your ammo from them. Start off with a .22 caliber and have them show you how to hold it, how to aim it, and how to properly fire it. If it jams, then let the RSO (range safety officer) know immediately and he will clear it for you. IMHO I would see if they have a .22 revolver for they are the safest and most simple cartridge to use. If not, then use a .22 semi auto and load in 3 rounds at a time and count each time you fire so you KNOW that the pistol is empty. The RSO will help you load the pistol properly and guide you along the way. RSO's are trained to help new people and they will be very safety conscious so listen to them carefully. Let them guide you all the way and make sure they are behind you when you fire. The thing to keep in mind whenever you shoot do not put your finger on the trigger until you are ready to fire. Take your time and don't worry if you miss the target. That will come later. Keep the pistol pointed down range at ALL times. Never forget SAFETY-SAFETY-SAFETY!!! You are there to LEARN so do it in a safe manner. The is no such thing as a dumb question!!! If you are unsure about anything, lay the pistol down and back off the firing line. You are not ready for a teacher to come in and teach you more than you understand. Every range has RSO's and many of them are very friendly with no added cost. You have a lot to learn and it is done slowly and over time, maybe a long time, you will learn the basics.

    Tommy
     

  3. richr

    richr Member

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    +1 on everything Tommy wrote above. Speaking for myself, but I'm sure most folks on this forum can't remember a time when they didn't know the rules of gun safety, or a time when they didn't know how to shoot. We learned from our fathers and uncles at an early age, how to hunt and shoot, and how to do it safely. We learned from them a healthy fear of what damage a firearm could do if used in an unsafe manner. We learned eye dominance as 6 yr. olds in Cub Scouts shooting Red Ryder BB guns. We learned to shoot rifles, shotguns, and pistols, starting from the smaller calibers and moving up as we grew up, using whatever open sites or optics they had on their guns for us to use. We developed our own preferences for sighting systems as we grew older and shot more. We, in turn pass our knowledge on to the next generation. Good for Conservative to seek advice on how to get started as an adult, and wanting to learn the right way. I believe too many people get into guns without learning how to do it safely. I am glad you understand that getting a pistol and a carry permit are not to be taken lightly and that you now have a responsibility to learn how to carry and shot safely and effectively. Good luck, and I hope you find someone or a local organization to help you in your new passion for shooting.
     
  4. conservative

    conservative New Member

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    Thanks rich r ! I figured that it might be as tommy said but wanted to know for sure. I wasn't raised around guns and never had the opportunity to join Boy Scouts . My dad also never took me hunting since he was into fishing instead and he was usually too busy to do a lot of that as well. So I appreciate those who have had patience with me on this forum.
     
  5. allenr

    allenr Member

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    I am curious about people's accuracy experience when shooting with one or both eyes. Which way improves your accuracy.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2016
  6. conservative

    conservative New Member

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    From what I have read and watched online, you should learn to shoot with both eyes open. But as someone who has never shot I can't validate whether it affects accuracy.
     
  7. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    The main point of shooting with both eyes open is to avoid losing the information that the closed eye would be providing if it were open.

    Your specific problem (spots in the eyes) is another story entirely and hasn't been addressed here. If you haven't been examined by an ophthalmologist, you should be. If there is no surgical fix, you may be limited to guns that can be utilized by pointing, i.e. shotguns.

    (There is a 'point-and-shoot' method for using single projectile weapons at close range, but you still need to be able to see the front sight during training, so that muscle memory gets it right; you just don't focus on the sight.)

    This whole thing has to get sort of complicated, by its very nature. Sorry if I'm not being clear.
     
  8. havasu

    havasu In the army now..

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    I was so hoping this thread was what I thought it was about! ;)
     

    Attached Files:

  9. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    ^^How did you get a picture of my girlfriends?
     
  10. allenr

    allenr Member

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    I think this thread is full of good advice. I am going to relate a personal experience with eye floaters (black spots) that I developed about a decade ago. They were diagnosed as floaters which are tissues that broke away from the back of the eye called the vitreous.

    Initially it was a handicap to my aiming because black dots literally got in the way. My answer to that was more target practice. Eventually o got back to the accuracy level I previously had.

    To get past the problem when I target shot I used front sight aiming. That is getting the front sight on the target without focusing on the target. Then change the barrel axis to get the front sight lined up with the rear sight. That is something you can do dry firing to get acquainted with it.

    By using the front sight as the primary aiming tool you are most likely to hit a target out to 15 feet even if you have perfect rear sight alignment. Remember that you are not trying to become a pistol sniper. You just want to hit the target.

    I used that technique repeatedly and did learn to ignore the spots and keep the front sight in focus. Practice overcomes most impairments.

    I still have the floaters but I have learned to ignore them because I trained my brain to do that.
     
  11. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    Buster,

    We all know that just ONE of your girlfriends would hurt you let alone all 4 of them. You would be buried the next day if they ever got a hold of you. I know, you still have the eyes that God gave you, but he must have taken some common sense away from you also. I KNOW that one of them would end up burying me, but the smile would be on my face. It would take an undertaker 6 months to take the smile off of my face. Kind of like looking at guns, nice to look at but in your hands, it could be a tragedy. Better off thinking of them as you were walking through a museum.

    *YANK*****************YANK****************YANK*********!!!!!

    Tommy
     
  12. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    Allen,
    I am right eye dominant so I close my left eye when shooting. When I use my weak hand (left) I close my right eye. They claim you can shoot better with both eyes open and I have tried. Trouble is I learned how to shoot with one eye closed and after 60 years of shooting, it's a hard habit to break. That is another reason why I try to shoot with dominant and weak hands and eyes, in case I would get hit or hurt on one side, I still have the other side to try to return fire. When I dry fire (15 minutes per day) I practice with both hands and eyes. BUT I am still slow on the draw - DANG!!!

    Tommy
     
  13. spikedriver

    spikedriver Active Member

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    I MUST shoot with one eye closed. No matter what I am doing my off side eye tries to take over. Open sights, apertures, or scopes, no difference. I even start to get nauseous if I try for any length of time. So I just shoot with one eye shut.
     
  14. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    That's a head problem, Spike. If that's your only head problem, you're ahead of me, though. [Bad pun intended]
     
  15. spikedriver

    spikedriver Active Member

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    I think its actually an eye problem. My eyes don't focus at the spot where they are looking. It is corrected with prisms in the lenses of my glasses. I'm not sure if that's the problem or not but its my excuse. And no it wouldn't be my only head problem or even my biggest one!
     
  16. conservative

    conservative New Member

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    I have the prism glasses as well.