How often do you clean your dies?

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by Tommycourt, Oct 3, 2016.

  1. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    I just got through reloading another 250 rounds of .45ACP and was checking my COAL and was getting a reading of 1.257-1.262. I have my seating die set @1.255. So after I got through loading a hundred rounds, I dug out my cleaner and cleaned it thoroughly and then re-set the die. I noticed when I ran my cleaner spray into the die, I saw some "gunk" come out. Here in Az we have dust build up everywhere. I asked my wife what's on TV and she said dust. Normally I load about 1K or rounds before I clean them but I think since our summer is over (Thank God!) I am going to clean them about every 500 rounds. I check about every 5-8 rounds when seating and then I usually case gauge all of my rounds. What is your policy?

    Tommy

    BTW- I was using my single stage loader and not my progressive.
     
  2. phideaux

    phideaux Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I try to remember to take them apart and clean them in the Spring and then in the late Fall, and usually a third time , if I'm reloading a lot.
    I clean the sizing dies more often, probably 4-5 hundred rounds , because they take the most abuse.

    I usually soak them in Acetone for a while , when I'm doing other things around the shop.
    Wipe them off , blow gun them, and reassemble.



    Jim
     

  3. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    When the necessity becomes obvious.
     
  4. SavageGuy

    SavageGuy Active Member

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    ^^^^Same thing here
     
  5. MagBlackhawk

    MagBlackhawk Patriot

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    ^^^ What they said ^^^
     
  6. noylj

    noylj Member

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    Clean my dies? If I have a problem that can be traced to some actual build-up I will clean my dies. Folks who can't control their bullet lube with lead bullets may have to clean their seating stem occasionally. Folks who have never lightly chamfered their case mouths may find some brass slivers in their expander or seating dies that they can, if they want, clean out.
    Dies are either on the press (working surface facing down), on a toolhead in storage (working parts facing down), or in a drawer (working parts out of the way of dust).