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Tommycourt
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Right now I am going through some confusion on what is a safe powder load for my .45 Rugers 1911. Reading through various charts I have read different loads using W231 Winchester powder. I am using a Handy Dandy little rotor set and the #8 rotor stated that it will load 5.0 grs. of 231. Upon inspection I find that the rotor actually uses 5.5 grs. In looking up different charts I see that there is much confusion on a safe load involving W231. One chart stated that 6.3gr. is the max. whereas 5.3 is max. I would like to keep using my Handy Dandy rotors however I am in question as 5.5 grs. of W231 is safe to use. I am using Berry plated bullets (.452) and have previously been using Bullseye and found them to be accurate and safe. Does anyone know if 5.5 grns. is too much for .45 cal. or will it be safe? I hope someone has some experience with the loading data. MY COAL is @1.250. Help me please????
Tommy
 

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Right now I am going through some confusion on what is a safe powder load for my .45 Rugers 1911. Reading through various charts I have read different loads using W231 Winchester powder. I am using a Handy Dandy little rotor set and the #8 rotor stated that it will load 5.0 grs. of 231. Upon inspection I find that the rotor actually uses 5.5 grs. In looking up different charts I see that there is much confusion on a safe load involving W231. One chart stated that 6.3gr. is the max. whereas 5.3 is max. I would like to keep using my Handy Dandy rotors however I am in question as 5.5 grs. of W231 is safe to use. I am using Berry plated bullets (.452) and have previously been using Bullseye and found them to be accurate and safe. Does anyone know if 5.5 grns. is too much for .45 cal. or will it be safe? I hope someone has some experience with the loading data. MY COAL is @1.250. Help me please????
Tommy
I'm going to assume that you are talking about 230 grain bullets. The Lee "Modern Reloading" 2nd edition says 5.3 grains is the W231 max load for both jacketed and lead 230 grain bullets. This manual uses data established by the powder distributers - in this case Hodgdon. I would accept their data.

Load a few cases that way. If you see no evidence of excessive pressure, and want to push harder... the Hornady manual 9th edition lists 5.7 grains max W231 for jacketed bullets, for whatever that's worth.

All of this may be useless to you, if you are addicted to Handy Dandy. ;)
 

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Tommycourt
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2,139 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm going to assume that you are talking about 230 grain bullets. The Lee "Modern Reloading" 2nd edition says 5.3 grains is the W231 max load for both jacketed and lead 230 grain bullets. This manual uses data established by the powder distributers - in this case Hodgdon. I would accept their data.

Load a few cases that way. If you see no evidence of excessive pressure, and want to push harder... the Hornady manual 9th edition lists 5.7 grains max W231 for jacketed bullets, for whatever that's worth.

All of this may be useless to you, if you are addicted to Handy Dandy. ;)
My Handy Dandy puts out 5.5 grns. exactly! I measured it on my digital scale and my balance scale. However, I may have to go back to spoon feeding my rounds. Only round I shoot it a Berry double plated (or so they say) 230 gr. round nose. Problem is believing which manual is correct. As one guy mentioned, it's not the loaders doing the manuals, it's the lawyers. With the plated bullet the manual tells you to use the alloy (lead) bullets as your guideline. Since these powder people have merged and been bought out, the specs keep changing.
With that in mind, using the 5.5 grns., would you suggest extending the COAL or leave it at 1.250??
Tommy
 

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My Handy Dandy puts out 5.5 grns. exactly! I measured it on my digital scale and my balance scale. However, I may have to go back to spoon feeding my rounds. Only round I shoot it a Berry double plated (or so they say) 230 gr. round nose. Problem is believing which manual is correct. As one guy mentioned, it's not the loaders doing the manuals, it's the lawyers. With the plated bullet the manual tells you to use the alloy (lead) bullets as your guideline. Since these powder people have merged and been bought out, the specs keep changing.
With that in mind, using the 5.5 grns., would you suggest extending the COAL or leave it at 1.250??
Tommy
I wouldn't load 5.5 grains until after test firing 5.3 grains. "Working up a load" is what it says it is, Tommy. 5.3 grains may perform so well that you'll be ecstatically :cryinglaugh: happy with it.

Your manuals probably list the COAL at 1.275, but 1.250 should be fine as long as your gun feeds it well. You won't be compressing W231 unless you make a serious :eek: mistake during the charging process.

Personally, I like to use a slower-burning powder in the .45 auto, N340 or 3N37. They take up enough room in the case to make a double charge obvious to the eye. My attention has been known to wander; so far I've paid attention during reloading - well. except for the time I seated 2 bullets before bothering to charge the cases.

:dizzy:
 

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I intended - and forgot - to add a comment about Berry's plated bullets. As long as you are very gentle with the taper crimp, they should be OK at any velocity the .45 auto (non +) handgun delivers.
 
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