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Hey ya. I've got a 181- serial no. It's got the all wood "furniture" on it. Took it to the range and blew off 4/5 20 rd mags of 5.56 in pretty quick succession. Had to wait about 30 min for it to cool down enough to put in the bag. Any nice heat shields out there to replace that front wood?
 

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Choate makes a nice, lightweight plastic one that has large size ventilation holes, and works well. They are generally available from Midway USA. If you can't find any, message me, and I can probably dig up a spare.
 

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OP might also check to be sure the shiny metal OEM heat shield is in place underneath the barrel and inside the fore end of the stock.

Some folks carefully enlarge the holes in the metal liner of the Choate unit to better match the somewhat larger holes in the plastic body of the guard, but most do not.

The Choate can be sanded and painted; Suggest temp-resistant paint, such as engine block paint.

Lots of metal/wood/plastic Handguards here, both vented and unvented: Ruger Mini 14 30 Rifle Hand Guards Rifles Guard Accuracy (ruger-mini-14-firearms.com)

IMHO, very hard to beat the Choate unit.
 

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Understood, but the OEM bottom metal fore-end heat shield must be in place, within the stock fore-end, for best heat/gas dispersion. Hence my "beneath the barrel" qualifier.

OP also requested help in dispersing heat from the firearm, hence my further comment on various (vented and unvented) handguards

Some owners of syn stocks have drilled some 3/16" Dia. holes down the length of the center/bottom of syn stock fore-ends to allow cool air to enter the bottom of the fore-end, waft around the lower heat shield, and exit the top of the fore-end through the vented handguard.

Such "air intake" holes do not seem to weaken the fore-end of the stock appreciably.

Note that most A2 ARs/M-16s have handguards with metal heat shields inside them (top and bottom), AND air vent holes in the top and bottom in the OEM handguards.

Put another way: Hot air (such as produced from a hot barrel) "wants" to rise. Having a vented Fore-end handguard is half the solution. Drilling some holes in the bottom of the fore-stock allows cool air to enter into the fore-end, replacing the hot air, and allows the barrel to "breathe". IMHO, that's the other half of the solution.

Can't prove it, but I strongly suspect that having air vents on top and bottom of the barrel/fore-end is far better than having just a simple vented handguard. Examples of this in other firearms, and simple physics leads me to think so.

I do not suggest drilling holes in an OEM wooden stock, particularly one which some might consider "collectible".
 
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