Gotta starting reloading

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by Tommycourt, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    I checked my ammo supply, .45 cal. and I am down to my critical stage. I have less than 1K rounds left. I am going to have to use my Herter's single stage because I have a 5lbs. coffee can full of belled and resized casings and are ready to prime. I set up my Dillon Square D to load .45 however I did not set up the primer correctly (after reading the book 10X) so I have to make a trip to Scottsdale to the plant and have them check on what I did wrong. The primers are not seating correctly. They have a lifetime warranty so I might as well take the time and have a tech check it over for me. Oh, BTW, last Sunday when I was down at the range, I swept up a bunch of range rounds and brought them home to sort out and reload. I found about 200 rounds of Federal brass however they are the small primer rounds. I try to keep 2500-3000 rounds on hand all the time because in the summer time, when the temp says 110 degrees outside, it's 115 in my loading room. I sweated it out last year and reloaded during the summer but after about an hour, the sweat pours out and it's not worth it. Even my do rag gets soaked. Gotta get my butt in gear and start reloading. Now the temp is cold (for me). It hasn't hit 60 degrees yet. Be glad when we are up in the mid 90's again!!!

    Tommy
     
  2. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    Yeah Tommy you better get busy reloading while your garage isn't an oven. Or put an a/c unit in your loading room. Could that cause a BOOM?
     

  3. squirrelhunter

    squirrelhunter Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    1,000?!?!? Shoot 200 is the most I usually have of any caliber...:D
     
  4. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    Me too. But Tommy has been focused on .45 auto for some time now.

    I think he needs to get himself a Coonan, if only to change the bang.

    ;)
     
  5. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    Maybe Tommy doesn't want the powder to go bad so he uses it up. When he has used up the powder then he has enough loaded.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2015
  6. squirrelhunter

    squirrelhunter Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    That'll probably never happen. :D
     
  7. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    Boy,

    I hope I don't run out of powder again!!!! I was sweating it last year (both from heat and lack of powder til my little brother came through and my neighbor from Oregon. Now I have a little over 8lbs. with more coming in February from Iowa. A good buddy of mine is coming to visit. YOU CAN NEVER, EVER HAVE TOO MUCH POWDER OR TOO MANY ROUNDS!!!!

    If Hiledebeast gets in, we will see all of our powder and bullets dry up!!

    Tommy
     
  8. squirrelhunter

    squirrelhunter Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    For me it's mainly a lack of funds plus I don't shoot much. Just checking my sights for hunting season and hunting. I've been on the same 50 round box of .223 and also 44 mag for like 4 years now and still have over a half box of each. Most of my shooting is when I'm working up loads then once I'm done with that,very little shooting.
     
  9. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    SquirrelHunter,

    I totally understand the lack of funds!! I go through that all the time. What I do is trade out some work or do something to generate a little extra income. This year, my neighbor is a snow bird from Oregon, I watched and watered all his plants and worked on his watering system and for that I got a 4lbs. keg of Bullseye. Believe me, it was a lot of work especially when it's 110+ degrees outside. I also have traded off a bunch of Model A parts and other car parts that I have had for a long time. I really have to watch my budget. One saving grace is the range I shoot at only charges me $9.00 to shoot and sometimes they don't charge me because I will clean up not only my lane but other lanes that are empty. It gives me a chance to find more .45 brass in doing so. I always try to leave something cleaner than when I found it. So brother, I really understand the lack of funds. There is no disgrace to being broke, but it's damned inconvenient.

    Best of luck buddy,

    Tommy
     
  10. Oldhand

    Oldhand AKA Rawhidekid! Lifetime Supporter

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    Tommy; When did they start using small primer 45 auto brass? I remember when 45 gap came out that was the way to tell them apart quickly.45 auto was large primer and gap was small. I picked up some brass at the range the other day and they had small primers but looked like standard 45 auto other than that.
     
  11. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    Hah! You may have started another rant.
     
  12. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    They started using small pistol primers a couple years ago although it's been within the last year that I have noticed more and more. You will find a lot of Federal rounds using small pistol, Winchester White Box and some other Winchester. Reason for doing this is to cut down on the production cost. You will also find that Blazer brass does not want to accept large primers as the primer pockets on the Blazer brass is containing a slight taper, starting large at the top and tapering down to the bottom of the primer well. One more thing is you may see some rounds that are marked NT (meaning non toxic) and these will have small primer pockets. You can load the small primers with small Winchester primers (if you are shooting .45) and they will work fine, however whenever I run into small primer rounds, I tend to pitch them. Same with Blazer, they hit the crap can. If you are using a progessive loader make sure you inspect the primer pockets thoroughly prior to loading. Have a standard size brass round on hand and have a small pocket brass on hand because it is very easy to get them confused. I prefer to keep 1 size primer on hand for reloading my .45's. GAP brass will only take small primers and DO NOT use them for loading .45ACP. Glock Automatic Pistol is a dying round and I run across them occasionally and after a while you can visually see, without any trouble the difference in the rounds. The brass will also be marked GAP.

    Tommy
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2016
  13. Oldhand

    Oldhand AKA Rawhidekid! Lifetime Supporter

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    Thank you for the fast response. I had a good friend pass on and leave me a Dillon 550. I have always used a RCBS Rock Crusher. I agonized over switching to the Dillon. I was working at the range at the time and had several customers come to have bullets removed from the barrels,(luck they felt the difference and didn't fire another round). All but one had been a progressive press. I traded the Dillon for a 45 auto, and never regretted it. I load 50 rounds an hour and they all go boom. :machinegun:
     
  14. MagBlackhawk

    MagBlackhawk Patriot

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    Good to know, I won't be buying ANY Blazer ammo.
    Thanks Tommy.
     
  15. Oldhand

    Oldhand AKA Rawhidekid! Lifetime Supporter

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    I have reloaded some Blazers I found with no problem, maybe because I use a Rock Crusher?:D
     
  16. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    You might be having better luck than I have with my old Herters single stage. Problem I was having is using a Lyman hand primer and the primers on Blazer will NOT seat the primer accordingly. Now I hadn't noticed it when I had an old Lee primer however it finally wore out on me. BUT the Blazer rounds that are coming out have the primer pockets tapered so I would suggest to tread carefully when hand loading your primers. If they fit then more power to you, however don't try to force them. It should only take light pressure to insert the primer. Again I state, the hand Lyman primer will not seat the Blazer brass to my satisfaction. I have had primers project ABOVE the casing head up to .003 above the flush seating needed. Good luck and by all means, please be careful!!!!

    Tommy
     
  17. Oldhand

    Oldhand AKA Rawhidekid! Lifetime Supporter

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    Thanks Tommy, I would not try to use a round that was not seated flush. As for seating pressure their are some variables. I always clean the pockets when the old primer is removed. Some rifle cases have a little brass stays if you will, Perfecta is one of them. Some foreign brass also seats hard. The Rock Chucker takes care of them all but it isn't always a light pull.;)
     
  18. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    Oldhand,

    I got to thinking last night and you had mentioned that you had a Dillon 550 and were reluctant to use it. And also that some of your buddies or pals had some FTF's using the Dillon 550. The major reason people have trouble with the Dillon 550 is the shell plate is NOT self indexing, meaning it does not automatically turn when it goes from stage 1 to stage 2, then 3 and 4. It has to be HAND indexed when in use. It's the ONLY Dillon that does it. I can tell you from personal experience that I was over to my brother's buddy's house and I played with his Dillon 550. While loading some .45 rounds we got to BSing and I forgot to manally index the shell plate which made me double charge the round. Luckily I spotted it right away and dumped that load. The Square D and the other higher priced Dillon automatically index the shell plate and you don't have to worry about double charging OR not putting powder in the brass that would give you a squib. I understand your reluctance to use it. That is one reason why I have NOT moved from the Square D up to the 550 reloader. They claim you can load more rounds with the 550 but why do it if you have ANY distractions as I did. It's not worth it safety wise. My Square D automatically indexes the shell plate thus taking the chance away of double charging or having a squib. Why Dillon does this? I have no idea. I also recommend anyone who buys a progressive reloader to buy a "snake light" so you can make sure that there is powder in the brass. No reason not to keep your powder loader at least half full when loading rounds, regardless of the size of round. Like you, I also like to use my Herter's for resizing and depriming so that way I can make sure the primer pockets are clean, however with once fired rounds, I will use the Dillon. Regardless I also weigh out every 3-5 rounds just to make sure I am getting the correct powder load. I would recommend anyone who buys a Dillon to make sure you have a full understanding of the process PRIOR to loading any rounds and then load about 50 "dud" rounds to check your COAL and make sure you are totally familiar with your system before loading to shoot. Just MHO but safety comes first!!!!!

    Tommy
     
  19. Oldhand

    Oldhand AKA Rawhidekid! Lifetime Supporter

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    Being retired, I am in no hurry to load. It keeps me out of the wife's hair and I enjoy doing it. When I lived closer to a place to shoot, I would only load five rnds of different loads then run down and see which my gun preferred. The 41 mag was the only gun I ever had that actually had the accuracy start to fall off before hitting max load. All the other cals had the groups still shrinking as max load was reached. Well keep your powder dry and get plenty of sleep.;)