Flashlights

Discussion in 'Optics / Sights / Lasers / Lights' started by SHOOTER13, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporter

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    What do you use when you need a bright light to illuminate the night...?


    I own two of these...one for my nightstand, and one for my Jeep.



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    SPECIFICATIONS


    Max Output: 65/120 lumens

    With optional ultra-high output lamp

    Runtime: 60/20 minutes

    With optional ultra-high output lamp

    Length: 5.10 Inches

    Weight: 5.30 Ounces

    Battery: Two 123A Lithium



    FEATURES

    Rugged aerospace-grade aluminum body, available with Type II anodizing in glossy black or Mil-Spec Type III hard anodizing in olive drab

    O-ring sealed, weatherproof

    Tempered Pyrex® window

    Pocket clip

    Tailcap switch: press for momentary-on, twist for constant-on

    Switch lockout prevents accidental activation during transport or storage



    The C2 Centurion is a compact (palm size) high-intensity incandescent flashlight for duty and tactical use or conditions requiring enhanced grip, similar to their Z2 but with pocket clip and slightly heavier body. Patented rubber grip ring allows the light to be operated with a handgun using the Rogers/SureFire technique. Puts out a smooth, brilliant, pre-focused tactical-level beam with four times the light of a big two D-cell flashlight - bright enough to temporarily blind and disorient a person by impairing his night-adapted vision. Light output may be nearly doubled with optional P61 lamp.
     
  2. bhale187

    bhale187 New Member

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    Streamlight stinger rechargable LED, insanely bright, fairly reasonable price, and durable as you could possible imagine. I have beat the hell out of my old stinger (not LED) thats about 14 years old, had to replace the battery about every 3 years and a bulb about the same, but if still works like it was new.
     

  3. threetango

    threetango Special Dance Instructor

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  4. MikeInVegas

    MikeInVegas New Member

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    I've been a fan of Surefire lights for years. I've got a 6Z combat light that lives on my nightstand, as well as a 6P and a G2 Nitrolon. I swapped out the factory bulbs in all three of them for Cree LED modules that give more or less double the light output of the factory bulb.
     
  5. Railbuggy

    Railbuggy Oath Keeper

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    59% KNO3 : 31.6% Al : 9.4% S-Just kidding.I have a older 5D cell MagLite.
     
  6. wingspar

    wingspar New Member

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    I’m a Fenix guy myself. The PD30 is my favorite most used light at 230 lumens. I have LD10's spread out in different rooms. Handy light for around the house.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. mark1945

    mark1945 New Member

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    I have a VR1 light with a redor green bulb either one is good to 200 yards.I use it for hog and coyote hunting at night and keep it on my night stand when Im not hunting.
     
  8. Blkhawk73

    Blkhawk73 Member

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    Nothing special for me. Fancy pricey flashlights don't do a thing for me. Have a Surefire I got a while back and honestly don't see it any better than some I've gotten at Home Depot for 1/10th the price. Pay more for a "tactical" :rolleyes: light and it last for just a short time or use the standard ol' C and D cell powered lights that last a looong time...
     
  9. threetango

    threetango Special Dance Instructor

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    So, all the law enforcement and military units that prefer these are wrong.
    I don't think so and here's just 4 reasons why.

    1. They’re lightweight.
    Tactical LED flashlights are generally made from lightweight aluminum, making them easier to carry for long periods of time. Hikers, campers, and other outdoor enthusiasts are praising tactical flashlights for this reason – even a few extra pounds can really become a burden on a long hike.
    2. They’re easy to use.
    Tactical LED flashlights are also gaining popularity because of their ease of use. Most tactical lights have large, simple on/off buttons, making them perfect for emergency situations. They are also very easy to use when wearing gloves, which can be a blessing if you get stuck out in a dark snow storm.
    3. They’re durable.
    Like tactical knives, tactical flashlights are extremely durable. Despite a lightweight aluminum casing, tactical flashlights are incredibly tough. Further, the lithium batteries that power tactical LED flashlights also perform very well under extreme temperatures. If you’re looking for a tougher flashlight, good luck.
    4. They produce great light.
    The brilliant LED light provided by tactical flashlights is hard to beat. LED bulbs also last much longer than regular bulbs, making that bright beam shine on for days after other flashlights call it quits.



    So if traditional lights are your choice that's fine.
    As for me, I like the features that tactical lights provide.
    Never compromise on quality.
     
  10. Boomerang

    Boomerang New Member

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    Although LED lights are good for the battery saving properties, LED has a couple faults still. Yes, lumens do matter, but more importantly is the color rendering and Kelvin temperature of LEDs. One of the biggest issues with LED is that its harder on the eyes in comparison to halogen or other incandescent lamp sources. Also most LED lights just don't have the distance that incandescent can have.
    The eye is sensitive to color and because we evolved with full spectrum light sources, our bodies were designed to work best with it. LED sources do not usually or have a very difficult time obtaining the color temperatures that ate most comfortable to our eyes AND they reflect colors back to you that are not "true" as incandescent sources do. What this means is that your eyes have a harder time seeing whats in front of you because your brain may not recognize an item because the colors are off.
    It sounds strange, but compare it to when people started putting compact fluorescent into their homes to replace incandescent... The lamps sucked, were too "cool" or "warm" in color meaning they gave off light that felt a little unnerving because it was so different from the redish incandescent glow we are used to.
    I have several years under my belt within the lighting industry and have way too much training in all of this, not to mention my personal experiences with using both expensive LED flashlights and expensive incandescent sources while out in the woods or in a city environment working on Search & Rescue missions. Feel free to puck my brain about these light sources if you have a question

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2
     
  11. Boomerang

    Boomerang New Member

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    I should alter my statement in that LED can do something other light sources cannot... You cannot compare LED lumens to incandescent lumens. Generally, more lumens is better, but mostly with incandescent or HID. The color rendering on very expensive, high quality LEDs that have a tight binning, which I have yet to see any LED flashlight, is able to be manufactured to make it possible to get better vision distance wise over incandescent with fewer lumens. This is where LED getz tricky and confusing for people. You could actually have far fewer lumens being produced, but when the chips are rendered correctly it actually enables you to see better and further than with incandescent or HID. The reason is that the color can be created to relax the eyes and allow your pupils to open up more. The color tends to be much cooler, or blue than incandescent, but this is a technique chain stores are using in parking lots to save money. See further = fewer pole/light fixtures required and there is the added security benefit of being able to see further. McDonalds is starting to do this by testing LED at some locations for one. I know this is different from a flashlight application, but the principles are the same and equally important.

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2
     
  12. Blkhawk73

    Blkhawk73 Member

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    Hmmm, maybe I mistyped...where did I say these types are "wrong" there Threetango?

    Regarding your points...

    • Weight - It's not an item I carry so not worried about weight and those in the truck aren't hampering the vehicle at all.
    • Ease of use - Yup, the old fashioned on/off button sure was burdensome. To think that the button was right there on the grip where it's naturally under my thumb.
    • Durability - For what I use them for, casting light in the dark, I'm not concerned if I can hammer a nail in. Being up here in the northeast where it gets cold, I don't recall having issues with any lights I've had.
    • Light - and to think all those Maglites everyone praised are actually horrible not being LEDs. Who'd have guessed it... At least those old fashioned light can be used for quite a loong time before the batteries die.

    Yup, to each their own and foe me, the whole "tactical" gimmicks just don't impress or make me see things are superior. Of course the compromising on quality must hold over for the firearms too. Freedom Arms not Ruger right? ;) Hk not Ruger right? Does it simply need a "tactical" title to be quality? ;)
     
  13. justin626

    justin626 New Member

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    Thinking about picking up a Streamlight Pro-Tac HL. 500 lumens high/ 15 lumens low/ strobe for around $100. Seen it for $60 online.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013
  14. threetango

    threetango Special Dance Instructor

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    Now that has some power Justin.
    I like it and that's a reasonable price..
     
  15. bhale187

    bhale187 New Member

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    The thing I like most about the streamlight stingers is that you can leave them in a charger forever or use them every day. That's true of most high quality rechargable lights of course.

    That and I am rough on flashlights, hell, I'm rough on about everything I own. Because of that I don't mind spending the extra money for higher quality, more durable stuff because I only have to pay the high price once instead of every time I use/abuse 'em and break the cheaper alternative.
     
  16. ccryder

    ccryder New Member Lifetime Supporter

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    In the time frame of this thread I've seen the LED output just go crazy. In the $60-$90 price range this year started off with ~300 lumens and now we are at the 800-900 level with the same and sometimes better run times. One main difference b/t the el-cheapos and the higher price is the current regulation. You will notice the cheap ones start off bright but quickly go down hill . Current regulated maintain light output until just at the end of battery charge.

    Just ask my Wife, I am a flash-aholic. I do have more than enough flashlights for everyday needs but, when the storms come or emergencies, a few spare HO lights make a big difference.

    As far as power sources, AA is where I started and I maintain a stable of AA lights and rechargeable batteries. Recently I have purchased 3-4 Nitecore lights that use CR123 or 18650 rechargeable. With the extra current available the output is nothing short of amazing.

    BTW: the current crop of LED lights are very reliable with out the shock problems that traditional bulbs have. It is very rare to have an LED module fail. Even if you used it as a hammer!

    Time2run

    Neil S


    Sent from my iPhone using Ruger Forum