firing pin spring help wanted

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by DrDenby, Dec 30, 2015.

  1. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    1
    0
    In what circumstances would I want to replace a stock firing pin spring with an extra power?

    Doc
     
  2. gwpercle

    gwpercle Member

    119
    13
    18
    What gun are we referring to ? More details would help.
     

  3. gunslinger669

    gunslinger669 Active Member

    1,091
    1
    38
    If you changed a titanium pin to one of steel, perhaps.
     
  4. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture New Member

    79
    1
    0
    A stronger spring gives a shorter time between when sear releases, and when the pin strikes the primer.

    You install the stronger spring if you think those milliseconds make a difference in how accurate you shoot.

    For normal humans it can't, and is a reason to spend more money on gun parts.
     
  5. phideaux

    phideaux Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,932
    96
    48
    Intermittent light primer strikes may warrant it.
    Original spring may have become a little weak.




    Jim
     
  6. uniongap

    uniongap New Member

    298
    1
    0
    I agree if the stock spring has weakened you should replace with a stock spring first. You may compound your troubles if the stronger spring causes a new problem.
     
    SGW Gunsmith likes this.
  7. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

    2,733
    22
    38
    Hah. I wonder why nobody thinks the subject is rebound spring?

    ;)
     
  8. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    1
    0
    OK, something isn't making sense here.

    Or it could be I have it all ass backward.

    It seems like an extra power firing pin spring would cause even lighter strikes.

    When the hammer hits the back of the firing pin, wouldn't more energy be lost driving it into a heavier spring before it contacts the primer?

    Causing even lighter strikes?

    Doc
     
  9. gunslinger669

    gunslinger669 Active Member

    1,091
    1
    38
    Yes, but if the mass of the pin changes, like from aluminum or titanium to steel, you would need a heavier spring.....just me thinking out loud.....
     
  10. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    1
    0
    Hell, with it. Picked up a extra power spring for $3 total.

    Put it in one of my 1911.

    Will see what it does at the range.

    Cant hurt anything, right? worst that happens is I get failures to fire.

    Doc
     
  11. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

    2,733
    22
    38
    Hah, hell with your hell-with-it. I feel the need to inquire. :D

    All the rebound spring has to do is retract the firing pin back into the bolt, right? Is the stronger spring an attempt to overcome gumminess and or dirt in the bolt? Whazzup there anyway?
     
  12. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    1
    0
    No, no problems.

    My inquiry was prompted by an overheard conversation by a couple guys as they were getting in their truck to drive away from the range.

    So I had no opportunity to ask questions.

    The one said that he has been trying to replace all of his firing pin springs with extra power springs.

    It seemed like such an odd thing to do.

    So I was wondering why one would want to replace the springs like that.

    I haven't been able to shoot the 1911 that I put the ep spring in yet. Keeps raining each day I have the chance to go.

    Doc
     
    silveradoman59 likes this.
  13. Carl Crosby

    Carl Crosby Member

    94
    18
    8
    Comment on a 2015 post! When the striker spring in your 36 year old 77-22 looks all rusty!;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2020
    SGW Gunsmith likes this.
  14. SGW Gunsmith

    SGW Gunsmith Active Member

    125
    62
    28
    The firing pin spring is a RETURN spring. If someone is getting "intermittent" light strikes, why the hell would they want to add an extra power spring?
    Getting light strikes, you then might consider a heavier hammer spring. :rolleyes:

    Who uses "aluminum" firing pins? And why would you need a "heavier" return spring for a titanium firing pin? Goes against the laws of physics.