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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys,

I thought to start a thread about our experiences in firearms safety training school. If you have got the safety training in school then please share about your experiences here - how did you get trained, your awkward gun shot, score, duration, target practicing lessons, favorite instructor etc. I think it may become a very useful thread for people new to guns. :)
 

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Family and military taught since I was around 7 years old. No "school" per se. Just life.
 

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Have taken 5 or six different classes and courses ranging from the way too basic to a full week at Thunder Ranch. One of the most notable things from any came form a class taught by my then professor. He held up a pencil and a pistol. "Both of these make marks. One you can erase the mark, one you can't so be 110% certain when you squeeze the trigger it's a mark your willing to make."

So simple yet it's something that has stuck with me for almost 20 years now.
 

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AKA Rawhidekid!
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My training was first my dad then military, (expert rifle & pistol). Was an Arizona Ranger for three years, then shot the Cowboy Shoot, IDPA, then worked as range officer for five years. Only person I saw load a magazine with the bullets reversed was a Corrections officer, worst person for shooting neighbors target was a police officer.
 

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Hello guys,

I thought to start a thread about our experiences in firearms safety training school. If you have got the safety training in school then please share about your experiences here - (1) how did you get trained, (2) your awkward gun shot, score, duration, (3) target practicing lessons, (4) favorite instructor etc. I think it may become a very useful thread for people new to guns. :)
(1) How Did I Begin Training? The year was 1952. The place was close to Fred Waring's Famous, 'Shawnee On The Delaware' Resort. I was 9 years old; and a group of active service United States Marines, many of whom had seen action in Korea, began instructing me in the use of single-shot 22 caliber rifles.

When I missed the target I was removed from the line, and told to watch. Worse than this I quickly realized that my instructors had contempt for me whenever I missed; and they would begin to favor other boys in our group over me.

Because one of those men was like a father to me, and I am positive would have protected me with his life had the occasion ever arose, I couldn't live with that!

So, for perhaps the very first time in my life, I quietly resolved within myself that I was NOT going to miss. Long story short: I didn't; and the shooting skills I acquired that summer have stay with me, pretty much, throughout my entire life - In fact, speed and marksmanship became something of an obsession!

(2) Awkward shot(s)? There haven't been too many. After a debilitating accident that prevented me from walking, my shooting skills went all to hell; and I had to struggle greatly in order to regain them; and, again, after a severe heart attack - and as so many similarly afflicted older men will - I lost the ability to handle a pistol well.

When I returned to the firing line and watched some of my older shooting acquaintances using their pistols, I decided that I was NOT going to live with the same outrageous, 'post heart attack trigger flinch' that they were.

(One of these men was a pistol shooter who I had competed against some 30 years earlier; and, to my horror, after his heart attack this frequent match winner absolutely stunk with a gun in his hand. After watching him firing his pistol I made up my mind that as long as I could hold a pistol I wasn't going to end up like that, too!)

Pistol shooting is a combination of: (1) Mentally (academically) knowing how to shoot, and (2) having the physical wherewithal to be able to actually do it. One talent without the other ain't going to cut it. A competent marksman MUST know how to do it BEFORE he pulls the trigger; AND, he must pull that trigger in as perfect accord as possible with the knowledge he holds precious inside his head!

(3) Target Practice Lessons? There have been many thousands! You can never practice enough; and regular practice - BOTH actual live-fire, and dry-fire too - is the key to developing and maintaining your marksmanship skills.

(4) Favorite Instructor? That would be United States Marine Corps Second Lieutenant Heywood Lawrence Day. I've never known a better man in a fight; and I've never known a better man with either a knife or a gun. I would have followed Mr. Day into hell, itself, if he'd asked me to.

Men whom I think are the most skillful and didactic among today's better known names? My own choices would be (in no particular order of preferential assignment) Colonel Jeff Cooper, Jim Cirillo, D.R. Middlebrooks, Dave Spaulding, Robert Vogel, Clint Smith, Robbie Leatham, and Massad Ayoob.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It took me 20 days to learn about firearms and properly doing the gun maintenance (Cleaning and oiling every component of the gun) on my own. My worst experience was when I failed in the test. I missed 6 shots out of 10 (I still don't know why I couldn't make it that day). My best moment was when I become eligible to apply for gun license and buy any medium capacity handgun for myself.
 
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