Electric vs Gasoline costs.

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by buster40c, Jul 7, 2017.

  1. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    It figures like most everything the great ones get the cart ahead of the horse before whipping the cart.


    This will make you scratch your head!





    ELECTRIC CAR...Hmmm... It makes you wonder…

    Ever since the advent of electric cars, the REAL cost per mile of those things has never been discussed. All you ever heard was the mpg in terms of gasoline, with nary a mention of the cost of electricity to run it. This is the first article I’ve ever seen and tells the story pretty much as I expected it to.

    Electricity has to be one of the least efficient ways to power things yet they’re being shoved down our throats… Glad somebody finally put engineering and math to paper.

    At a neighborhood B B Q I was talking to a neighbor, a BC Hydro executive. I asked him how that renewable thing was doing. He laughed, then got serious. If you really intend to adopt electric vehicles, he pointed out, you had to face certain realities. For example, a home charging system for a Tesla requires 75 amp service. The average house is equipped with 100 amp service. On our small street (approximately 25 homes), the electrical infrastructure would be unable to carry more than 3 houses with a single Tesla, each. For even half the homes to have electric vehicles, the system would be wildly over-loaded.

    This is the elephant in the room with electric vehicles... Our residential infrastructure cannot bear the load. So as our genius elected officials promote this nonsense, not only are we being urged to buy these things and replace our reliable, cheap generating systems with expensive, new windmills and solar cells, but we will also have to renovate our entire delivery system! This latter "investment" will not be revealed until we're so far down this dead end road that it will be presented with an 'OOPS!' and a shrug.

    If you want to argue with a green person over cars that are Eco-friendly, just read the following. Note: If you ARE a green person, read it anyway. It’s enlightening.

    Eric test drove the Chevy Volt at the invitation of General Motors … and he writes, "For four days in a row, the fully charged battery lasted only 25 miles before the Volt switched to the reserve gasoline engine.” Eric calculated the car got 30 mpg including the 25 miles it ran on the battery. So, the range including the 9-gallon gas tank and the 16 kwh battery is approximately 270 miles.

    It will take you 4-1/2 hours to drive 270 miles at 60 mph. Then add 10 hours to charge the battery and you have a total trip time of 14.5 hours. In a typical road trip your average speed (including charging time) would be 20 mph.

    According to General Motors, the Volt battery holds 16 kwh of electricity. It takes a full 10 hours to charge a drained battery. The cost for the electricity to charge the Volt is never mentioned so I looked up what I pay for electricity. I pay approximately (it varies with amount used and the seasons) $1.16 per kwh. 16 kwh x $1.16 per kwh = $18.56 to charge the battery. $18.56 per charge divided by 25 miles = $0.74 per mile to operate the Volt using the battery. Compare this to a similar size car with a gasoline engine that gets only 32 mpg. $3.19 per gallon divided by 32 mpg = $0.10 per mile.

    The gasoline powered car costs about $20,000 while the Volt costs $46,000+… So the American Government wants loyal Americans not to do the math, but simply pay three times as much for a car, that costs more than seven times as much to run, and takes three times longer to drive across the country.

    Email copied.
     
  2. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    My Toyota Prius C hybrid (traded in last fall) averaged ~50mpg - which included keeping the battery charged. Could there be something wrong with your friend's figures - or is a hybrid many times more efficient than a plug-in?
     

  3. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    I don't have one and probably never will so I have no idea. Like anything on the internet it has to be true. LOL Keep searching and there could be a totally different perspective about it somewhere.

    I looked into perhaps using a golf cart to run to town. Of course there are all types of laws governing them that have to be met to use one on the road.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2017
  4. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    Buster,

    Years ago when I was into golf I had a golf cart but it was a gasoline EZ Go cart. It was really nice and I bought it used for around a thousand bucks. I kept it at the golf course. Many of the "elite" golfers had electric carts and they were always forgetting to plug them in or having to replace batteries. Batteries are not cheap. Will I ever have an electric car? Hell no! We have all kinds of carts in the tract I live in because it is a senior living cart and I can tell you that most of them will not run electric cart due to the maintenance. Gas is the way to go. So much for the Tesla I guess you could say

    Tommy
     
  5. havasu

    havasu In the army now..

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    My cousin has a Tesla and he admits to costing him about $20 to fully charge it, but that is based on the fact that he uses alot of electricity at his home and is on top of the tier, paying more money for electricity. That $20 will take him 200 miles.
     
  6. greg_r

    greg_r Well-Known Member

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    I was considering a hybrid. I was hearing 50 + mpg. Then I heard that the high mpg was for city driving, it reverts to gas power for highway. My commute is 70 miles one way, probably 95% of it US highways. Even if electric/hybrid was a good idea, looks like it would not work for me.
     
  7. Fireman22

    Fireman22 Active Member

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    My wife drives a 2010 Prius and she loves it. I like it too but prefer my pickup. At the time that we purchased it, all the Toyota literature claimed it would get 51 mpg city and 48 mpg highway. At first I was a Doubting Thomas but after our family driving vacation from MA to Branson, MO, I'm a believer.

    The attached photo shows the odometer upon our return home (3,366.1 miles round trip). I wish I still had the receipts and the actual figures for the whole trip so I could calculate the actual mileage but I don't. However, as the photo indicates, the car does quite well as the mpg for the last portion of the trip (which was from a dinner stop in eastern CT to home, about 130 miles with an hour and a half on the highway and a half hour on back roads) was 49.3 mpg.

    Of course results do vary greatly with how you drive (stomping the accelerator versus feathering it) and how much weight you carry.

    Sorry I can't contribute to the electric car conversation. I don't have any knowledge or experience with them.
     

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  8. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    The highway driving 'regime' is, in the case of the Prius C anyway, influenced by the continuously variable transmission. According to one of the several informational windows my Prius displayed, the electric motor was not on solo duty a whole lot of the time. Interstate Highway mileage however, averaged about 55 MPG for me. This was in Vermont/New Hampshire hill country, light to moderate traffic. with the cruise control set to 65 MPH.

    A modern automobile is a complicated pseudo-intelligent instrument. Isolating the effects of its constituent parts ain't easy.
     
  9. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

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    I have to say I have yet to see an electric car on the side of the road with a dead battery. I have seen a few Smart cars {wedge slice of cheese} on the expressways running right along with traffic for the most part.
     
  10. havasu

    havasu In the army now..

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    I also never see an electric car on the open road or in the desert.
     
  11. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

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    I don't think you will see many electric cars in the desert states. The sun is so extreme that batteries have a life of about 3 years regardless of the battery you buy. A 7 year battery might last a year longer than 3 yrs. however the heat is so bad that it eats up the batteries. Cold weather is much more forgiving as you can tell when you battery is being deplenished where as in the desert, the battery just quits. Of all of my cars and the cars I have owned (too many) and cars I have built we only stick in 3 year batteries and not worry about the warranty. Plus on an electric car, how much maintenance is there going to be keeping the terminals from corroding? When the ambient temp hits 115 degrees, what do you think the temp is inside your firewall. That gas engine still has to run at sometime or another and that's what builds up the heat. MHO!!!

    Tommy
     
  12. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

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    The electric cars don't have a gas engine. In Toyota hybrids the battery is not in the engine compartment. The battery has very little resemblance to a gas engine's 'conventional' battery anyway. All that being what it is, it seems like heat is probably an undesirable 'feature'. In a hybrid the battery could partake of the car's air conditioning, but seems like that would be robbing Peter to pay Paul in an electric car.

    I love to speculate in ignorance, because the possibilities open up nicely. :)