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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can gouges in these new plastic frames be repaired?

I tried a few times to take pictures but they just did not turn out.

It came from what I think is ignorance of the previous owner. It looks like screwdriver marks at the takedown lever. You know how with most new autoloaders that lever can be pretty stiff, well it looks like he took the screwdriver to it.

If it were normal wear and tear marks that came on my watch, I would not think twice about it.

But it is bugging me that they are gouges another idiot made.

Is there any durable cosmetic fix to polymer marring?

Doc
 

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When taking pictures I find it is better to take them outside. Also when you put the pic on your pc then open the pic and where it says file, edit, fix then click on fix and you can adjust the brightness, contrast, shadows and highlights. That's what I did to your pics so could see them better.
I think there is a thread here about taking better gun pics.
As far as fixing polymer check out the last post on this thread from sigtalk.com
http://sigtalk.com/sig-sauer-pistols/16269-sig-p2022-frame-surface-scratches.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I appreciate the link, buster.

The problem is that his scratches were so shallow, he could not even see it unless the frame was tilted a certain way.

These are "gouges" .

I don't think there is any material removed but they are too deep to "buff out" for sure.

Doc

I also appreciate the advice on the picture taking. Those pics I took of the 1911 was actually outside, in bright daylight. So I don't know if it is just a crappy camera or it is on some setting that I still haven't learned. Damn thing has more settings/meters/adjustments than a fighter jet cockpit.
 

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Birddogyz might help you out with the camera settings. He takes awesome pictures.
I wonder, some set a hot wet pad over a low spot on wood and apply heat to the pad. It supposedly raises the wood back up. I never had any luck with doing it though. Anyway I wonder if this would work on polymer gun parts?
 

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I think the heating the wood thing relies on the cellular structure of wood. You might try one of the two part epoxies sold for use on some plastics, Plasticweld by the JB Weld people being one. Use a pin head sized dot of the stuff somewhere first to test it. Come back and tell us all when you perfect the technique, this could make you famous.
 

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I'm sure you've been told this before, but guns get marks on them. People, especially people that are OCD should not shoot firearms. They get character marks on them. Unless you're going to leave them in a safe, don't shoot them. Steel guns can be polished out. No good cure for gouged plastic. You'll probably make it look worse. It's another reason why I like steel firearms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Of course. No one should have to be told that. It is common sense. An idiot gets bothered by normal wear and tear marks.

As I said, these are NOT normal wear and tear marks. As I said, these are heavy deep gouges made by ignorance and it is obvious they were made by ignorance.

That being said, it looks like I have to live with it, knowing that anyone who sees it is undoubtedly thinking I am the moron who made them :(

Doc
 

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Personally, I wouldn't screw around with it. Why? Because there are a few custom shops out there that really know how to make top quality polymer repairs; and, besides, hot polymer emits toxic fumes that also need to be managed throughout the repair process.

One of the best, 'polymer-smiths' I know is Lane Owens at Cold Bore Customs. I'm sure he would charge a fair price for the work.
 

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Of course. No one should have to be told that. It is common sense. An idiot gets bothered by normal wear and tear marks.

As I said, these are NOT normal wear and tear marks. As I said, these are heavy deep gouges made by ignorance and it is obvious they were made by ignorance.

That being said, it looks like I have to live with it, knowing that anyone who sees it is undoubtedly thinking I am the moron who made them :(

Doc
I've never heard a person being called a moron for having marks on their firearm. They just show that you actually use the firearm, instead of talking about it.;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You heard it first here then :)

I am calling anyone that takes a screwdriver and starts digging gouges into a gun a moron. First gouge, maybe stupid mistake. But after 5, I am calling it.. certified moron
 

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You heard it first here then :)

I am calling anyone that takes a screwdriver and starts digging gouges into a gun a moron. First gouge, maybe stupid mistake. But after 5, I am calling it.. certified moron
I can show you some gouges in a 1911 that some moron made:p Everyone learns on one of their firearms;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
But of course, I have self inflicted marks/gouges too. I made stupid mistakes. This guy took a screwdriver over and over and over and over and over leaving deep and heavy gouge after gouge after.. you get the point.

The first, maybe just maybe the second, should have been enough to make him realize it aint working.

An interesting note: I found a kit that repairs polymer beautifully. Would take a microscope to tell the damage... and best part is its ONLY five thousand dollars... I can't wait to get it!!!

Yeah right :cryinglaugh: , nah, I've given up
 

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Bondo 280 Epoxy Plastic Bumper / Plastic Panel Repair Kit.
Just follow the directions, repairs plastic cars and plastic guns!

Gary
 
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