Confuzzled

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by DrDenby, Oct 27, 2016.

  1. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    1
    0
    This is baffling me and I can't find any explanation.

    So, I am hoping that you reloaders who have been at this for a long time, or anyone else for that matter can clear this up.

    Trying to take advantage of Xtreme Bullets free shipping on all orders BELOW $1500, I came across something I have not noticed before.

    Why is it that some 9mm bullets (sorry, have not compared other calibers yet) have a listed diameter of .355 some with .356 and some with .357

    It can't be "tolerances" because they are listed specifically with those diameters.

    I know it is a difference of only a couple thousandths of an inch.

    Nearly (or in my case DEFINITELY) unable to detect unaided, but still why?

    Doc

    ps here is the link to see what I mean.

    http://www.xtremebullets.com/9mm-s/9666.htm?searching=Y&sort=1&cat=9666&show=160&page=1
     
  2. Tommycourt

    Tommycourt Tommycourt

    2,139
    17
    38
    Doc,

    The way it looks it's the copper plating that adds .001 the the width of the bullet. In my plated I use .452 Berry plated(.45 cal) bullets and you can buy lead bullets and some plated that are .451. Just make sure that when you mushroom the casing, you ensure that you enlarge the casing to accept the larger diameter bullet. You won't hurt anything but it makes it easier to seat the bullet and ensure you have the proper crimp.

    Tommy
     

  3. MagBlackhawk

    MagBlackhawk Patriot

    2,150
    100
    58
    Sorry Doc, I don't know.

    But some makers of plated bullets sell at .355" for .380 and 9mm Luger. (Rainier)
    Some sell plated bullets at .356" for .380 and 9mm. (Berry's)
    I've used both.

    I prefer the .356" for both calibers because that extra .001" seems to help hold the bullet tighter in the case.
    Best I can tell, with plated bullets you have to rely on neck tension to hold the bullet because the plating is so soft crimping doesn't help much if any.

    And .357" for 9mm? I don't have a clue. Maybe it's for some other uncommon 9mm??? (Wild guess).

    If you were to use bullets with Real Metal Jackets I'd stay with .355" For Sure.
     
  4. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    1
    0
    See, I was wondering about that too, Tommy.

    But would not the manufacturer then just make the core of the bullet smaller to allow for plating thickness?

    And also the diameter differences are all with the plated.

    So essentially the bullets are being made specifically with 3 different diameters.

    Not worried about whether they can be used, it is the Why it is being made with different diameters that is confusing me.

    Edited: I just looked and the cast lead bullets are in the same choice of diameter

    So, now I am even more confused as jackets and plating are both irrelevant.

    Doc
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2016
  5. phideaux

    phideaux Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,933
    100
    63
    No expert here ,
    But,

    I'm thinking bore diameter is why.

    Slug your bore and then match the size to it.



    [​IMG]
    Jim
     
  6. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    1
    0

    Do WHAT now??
     
  7. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

    2,733
    24
    38
    Bullet makers react to market demands, same as most manufacturers do. You have a gun chambered in 9x19 Luger that was built in Lower Slobovia (where bore groove diameter for that cartridge is traditionally .357"), you want bullets that diameter.

    Guns chambered in .44WCF have been built with bore diameters ranging from .429 to .434 (maybe more). My B-92 in .44 Mag slugs at .432.

    Add to that the established fact that gun nuts are... well, nuts, some of them/us...
     
  8. SavageGuy

    SavageGuy Active Member

    3,442
    15
    38
    Jim's got it right. It's for different bore diameters. My 9mm both have a true bore of .356. Other bores can vary from .355 to .357.

    You should slug your bore.
    Have any old fishing sinkers lying around? Find one that is a bit bigger than your bore. Something like .4". Lube it up really well (preferably some sort of grease) and also lube the bore and muzzle. Pound the sinker into the barrel. Then, get a wooden dowel that fits just barely into your bore and pound the sinker all the way through. (Try to use a mallet btw, don't want to mess up your crown) then, measure the slug as it will now have an exact imprint of the inside of your bore on it.
     
  9. phideaux

    phideaux Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,933
    100
    63
    Hey Doc,

    There ya go ...^^^^^

    What that Savage just said..


    oh, sorry, Guy.:)




    Jim
     
  10. VThillman

    VThillman Active Member

    2,733
    24
    38
    Alternatively, you can pound on your gun (easier on the dowel).
     
  11. DrDenby

    DrDenby New Member

    411
    1
    0
    Looks like I have an interesting project this weekend.

    Not sure if I have any sinkers I want to mess up.

    I finally got my tackle boxes in order a few months ago.

    Thanks for the explanations.

    Doc
     
  12. Oldhand

    Oldhand AKA Rawhidekid! Lifetime Supporter

    1,868
    33
    48
    Also people with the 9mm Super would use the .356 & .357. Idid when I had one.;)
     
  13. noylj

    noylj New Member

    30
    4
    3
    9x19 plated bullets are well known for tumbling/keyholing. The solution in 99% of cases is to USE A LARGER DIAMETER BULLET.
    Even a 0.3545" groove barrel may do MUCH better with a 0.357" jacketed or plated bullet.
    Then, there are many 9x19 barrels out there with a groove diameter well above 0.357".
    Back with the dinosaurs (around the '70s), almost every one who shot a 9x19 (and there were few of us) used 0.357" jacketed bullets (as that was almost all we could find) or 0.357-0.358" cast bullets.
    I still do and have never had any pressure issues, even in my new modern guns with nice tight grooves (just like my P-08 Lugers from pre-WWII).
    Thus, I would order 0.356-0.357" bullets, period.
    Be very good idea if you haven't fired their plated bullets to get test samples first—you don't want a huge order of bullets that keyhole.
    I would go to coated lead bullets myself, but...