CCI Stinger ammo

Discussion in 'Ruger Firearms Accessories' started by lorenzo, Aug 15, 2014.

  1. lorenzo

    lorenzo New Member

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    As we all know, CCI makes a variety of different rounds in 22LR

    I am interested in trying some Stinger (1640 FPS ) In a Mark II Competition Target Model. AKA the Slab Side.

    Any comments before I do it.?

    Do you think it is too hot of a round?

    CCI has the following warning about it.

    Use only in firearms having standard ANSI sporting barrel/chamber dimensions.

     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2014
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  2. paulkalman

    paulkalman Member

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    three things, 1. hyper velocity ammo is specifically not recommended in your instruction manual. 2. it most likely will not fit in your chamber and if you fire it chances are pretty good it won't extract. 3. our barrels are not sporting chamber dimensions.
     
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  3. phideaux

    phideaux Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    ^^ what he said ^^

    and the case is longer than standard velocity which may cause feeding problems.
    I have several .22 semi auto handguns and rifles, and I do not shoot stingers in any of them.
    IMO, stingers are made for bolt action , or single shot .22 rifles.
    I love them in my bolt rifles.

    My .02

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2014
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  4. threetango

    threetango Special Dance Instructor

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    Here's what I found.
    Take it for what it's worth.

    The Target and Tactical models have different chambers from standard 10/22 models. The chamber is a bit shorter, so that the bullet just touches the rifling when the round is chambered. This is what makes the Target more accurate, not the extra heavy barrel. A Bentz chamber like the Target has a chamber that is .690 long, meaning that's where the rifling starts. Stingers, and the Quik-Shok that CCI also makes, have a longer case than a standard Long Rifle cartridge. The overall length is the same, but the case is longer and the bullet is shorter and lighter. A standard LR case is .613, and a Stinger case is .702.
    So, load a Stinger in a Target and you're putting a .702 case into a .690 chamber. It will go in and fire because the crimp at the end of the case is what enters the rifling. When the shot is fired, the rifling will keep the crimp from expanding as it should to release the bullet, the pressure is going to spike, and the case will likely burst.
    A standard sporter chamber, that all standard 10/22s have, is .775 long, and Stingers are no problem.
    tl:dr Stingers are fine in all 10/22s except the models mentioned.
     
  5. paulkalman

    paulkalman Member

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    he is mentioning a mk 2 competition model, there is no mention of any 10/22 in his question. My question is what is (are) the chamber lenght (s) of the target and competition models of the mark series?
     
  6. threetango

    threetango Special Dance Instructor

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    Right you are, got off track.
    CCI Stingers are hyper velocity ammunition and the Mark II owners manual states only standard or high velocity so (to the OP) No do not shoot the Stingers.
     
  7. lorenzo

    lorenzo New Member

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    Thanks everyone, I am NOT going to be using Stingers in my Mark II

    Thank you again.

    22 LR around here is hard to find but I did find some Stingers so I bought them just because they were available.
    I will use them in something else.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2014
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  8. https://www.youtube.com/c/22plinkster/search?query=cci+stinger
     
  9. jmohme

    jmohme Well-Known Member

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    I don't know about the Mark II, but I fed CCI Stingers to my bull barrel Mark I almost exclusively without issue.
     
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  10. TRY THE 40 GRAIN VELOCITOR

    .22VELOCITOR.jpg
     
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  11. rugertoter

    rugertoter Active Member

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    Good post. The cases on the Stinger are a tad longer, and you probably have a match chamber in your gun OP, so don't try to run the Stingers in it. Paulkalman is right here I believe.
     
  12. rugertoter

    rugertoter Active Member

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    Me too! I have a plain-Jane Savage Mk. II, that shoots them like a house afire.
     
  13. Give the CCI 40 grain copper plated Hollow Point Velocitor a try at 1435 FPS its a very accurate Round in both Pistol & Rifle .
     
  14. LOAD IT UP LET IT RIP TATER CHIP !
     
  15. SGW Gunsmith

    SGW Gunsmith Active Member

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    Wow! Talk about exhuming a 6 year old post! :eek:
    lorenzo, you've made a very well thought out choice. The above posts are mostly all correct, in that CCI does indeed make a myriad of .22 rimfire ammunition choices. So, there are plenty others rather than "hyper velocity" to choose from. The manual sent with every Ruger Mark pistol, except for the early Mark I & Standard pistols admonishes to NOT use ANY hyper velocity .22 rounds in the Ruger Mark pistols. And why would that be?
    The hyper velocity, 1435 FPS +, rounds produce much too much "recoil impulse energy" for the Ruger Mark pistols. And, the Stingers do indeed fit into the Ruger Mark pistol chambers.
    Here is a picture of a Ruger Mark II bolt stop pin that I removed from a customers 5½ bull barrel Mark II, where he admitted to using Stingers exclusively:
    [​IMG]
    The bolt stop pin is bent slightly and the front face has the back face of the bolt that contacts this pin fully embossed into that face.
    What's not visible is the elongated hole for this pin in the top side of the receiver. A bolt stop pin can be purchased for a little over $9.00, a receiver will cost a bit more than that.
    So, is it best to take Rugers advice and refrain from using "hyper velocity" rounds in your Ruger Mark pistol, or should you go forth and roll the dice and stick with Stingers? Neither those who advise for the Stinger use, nor Ruger, will provide you with any satisfaction or, for sure, any warranty.