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Got the wife the LCRX in 327 Federal. 2.5" barrel. I have started her off with S&W long wadcutters. So as mentioned in previous posts, she has weak hands/fingers. We shot it last Thursday and she is having a hard time cocking it, not impossible but not easy for her. She actually can hit the target in single action, forget double action for now... She cannot release the cylinder without two hands and then barely. Practice will help, but I keep thinking that maybe a gunsmith could smooth out the cylinder release button some. It is stiff and seems to rub a little. Maybe a smith could make the hammer/trigger just a little more manageable, especially in double action firing? The one time she fired double action she wasn't near the target. This is going to take some time as she is not a enthusiastic gun person. She is doing it because of me and the growing threats to all of us today. Thoughts please.
 

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Got the wife the LCRX in 327 Federal. 2.5" barrel. I have started her off with S&W long wadcutters. So as mentioned in previous posts, she has weak hands/fingers. We shot it last Thursday and she is having a hard time cocking it, not impossible but not easy for her. She actually can hit the target in single action, forget double action for now... She cannot release the cylinder without two hands and then barely. Practice will help, but I keep thinking that maybe a gunsmith could smooth out the cylinder release button some. It is stiff and seems to rub a little. Maybe a smith could make the hammer/trigger just a little more manageable, especially in double action firing? The one time she fired double action she wasn't near the target. This is going to take some time as she is not a enthusiastic gun person. She is doing it because of me and the growing threats to all of us today. Thoughts please.
When you open the cylinder, place your right thumb forward of the cylinder closer to the barrel and lightly push out the cylinder.
Instead of pushing the end of the cylindercloser to the grip.
You’ll notice a great ease when you open it up.
The cylinder lock up is the small detent that you speak of leaving a small scratch or ware on the wall of the receiver just next to the firing pin. That is 100% normal.
Also, when you close the cylinder, close it by pushing it closed from the crane.

Shooting single action, use the thumb of the weak hand.
Yes, the hammer spring can be changed to a lighter spring.
Over all, it takes a little getting used to it and plenty of practice.
 

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Hoping to not offend anyone, I think the problem has a simple cause and easy solution. She obviously does not have the stand strength to operate the gun. Imhave battled arthritis in my hands since 2015. I have held it off for a long time, but there is no way I can beat the problem even though I have been doing hand strength therapy for years. As my Doc Amy’s, the is no cure for the disabilities acquired by age.
If you have to customize a gun to make it controllable for her, then you bought the wrong gun. If you spend a thousand do;Lars on gun refinements, it will not make her hands stronger. Eventually any improved performance will be negated by deterioration of aging hand strength.
Handgun self defense is dependent upon three factors: 1) handgun control, 2) speed, 3) accuracy. All three of those factors are impeded by weak hand strength. No doctor or gunsmith is going to corset the problem. The correction is in gun selection.

I am not about to get into the details of that process, but I will offer this a misplaced 38 special bullet is not as effectiive as a 22 LR in the face. As my hands are driving me to a new era of strength, I am seriously looking at 22LR. The guns are very manageable and the cost of ammo allows for a lot of practice to improve accuracy and speed.
 

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Any caliber to the face is effective.
While you may not have faith in the 38 special it is still far superior to the 22 which is why law enforcement carried the 38 for many years.
Be sure that I know a 38 special is better than a 22LR. What I was trying to say was a 22LR in the face is better than a a 38 special to the arm, and that the 22 is easier on weak hands. It also is less expensive so that lots of practice is affordable, and practice enough and you can hit a perp in the face.
 

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I agree, the 22 ammunition is less expensive and may be more effective depending on placement.
I had a situation once and was forced to defend myself with a 22.

The 38 spl is light enough on recoil. When firing a 4” or 6” revolver, just for fun and experimental purposes it can be gripped with thumb and index finger and still be on target. Firing the 32 caliber would be lighter and still better than a 22. The 327 is far better than the 38 spl. It’s all for the fun and getting familiar with the revolver.
Recoil on a 2” revolver would be a little more stiff.
 

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Hoping to not offend anyone, I think the problem has a simple cause and easy solution. She obviously does not have the stand strength to operate the gun. Imhave battled arthritis in my hands since 2015. I have held it off for a long time, but there is no way I can beat the problem even though I have been doing hand strength therapy for years. As my Doc Amy’s, the is no cure for the disabilities acquired by age.
If you have to customize a gun to make it controllable for her, then you bought the wrong gun. If you spend a thousand do;Lars on gun refinements, it will not make her hands stronger. Eventually any improved performance will be negated by deterioration of aging hand strength.
Handgun self defense is dependent upon three factors: 1) handgun control, 2) speed, 3) accuracy. All three of those factors are impeded by weak hand strength. No doctor or gunsmith is going to corset the problem. The correction is in gun selection.

I am not about to get into the details of that process, but I will offer this a misplaced 38 special bullet is not as effectiive as a 22 LR in the face. As my hands are driving me to a new era of strength, I am seriously looking at 22LR. The guns are very manageable and the cost of ammo allows for a lot of practice to improve accuracy and speed.
I agree. It is a fact of life for many of us and denying it won't fix it. The real fact is, a firearm is not always the right answer, like it or not. If your wife is a "timid" gun person and she has a firearm because of you and YOUR fears, that is a mistake. When a problem happens she will probably not resort to the firearm and if she does, some miscreant could just as easily take it away from her. This is not Hollywood, the good guy does not always win, and hitting a target when you are afraid, untrained and have disabilities is like hitting the lottery, not likely..IMHO
 

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Any caliber to the face is effective.
While you may not have faith in the 38 special it is still far superior to the 22 which is why law enforcement carried the 38 for many years.
not if you can't hit with it. Most people do not shoot 2 in snub guns well, period, fact., regardless if they are .327, or .38 for someone who is not shooting regularly and has disabilities, weak hands, arthritic etc they are a real handful, no pun intended.
 

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not if you can't hit with it. Most people do not shoot 2 in snub guns well, period, fact., regardless if they are .327, or .38 for someone who is not shooting regularly and has disabilities, weak hands, arthritic etc they are a real handful, no pun intended.
You missed the point entirely.
There have been reports of men shot in the with a 22 and survived.
Just this past late January I booked a 32 yr old male into the federal prison whom had been shot 4 times in the throat.
Man walked and talked normal. Only bared the scars of entry wounds and exit wounds.
 

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You missed the point entirely.
There have been reports of men shot in the with a 22 and survived.
Just this past late January I booked a 32 yr old male into the federal prison whom had been shot 4 times in the throat.
Man walked and talked normal. Only bared the scars of entry wounds and exit wounds.
Yes, and there are account of people being shot multiple times with a ,45 and walking away, so what? it is a few few incidents and I can guarantee you that if he took 4 slugs in the throat, they were not in his larynx (adams apple ) etc. If they had he would be dead. After all ,when I was in DOD/DIA/DSE we were taught to crush the larynx, stab down through it for no noise or hammer it hard and have them drown in their own blood. The hits were probably on the side in a meaty portion and did not hit anything vital. Do you think he actually shrugged them off, or did it make him think about what he was going to do for the rest of the day? The .22 lr has dropped a lot of bad guys through out the years. I think you missed the point of which i made several. #1 A firearm is not always the right answer. #2 A hit with a .22 beats a miss with anything else every day of the week. #3 if the woman does not really want a firearm it is a really bad idea to push one on her. just MHO
 

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Yes, and there are account of people being shot multiple times with a ,45 and walking away, so what? it is a few few incidents and I can guarantee you that if he took 4 slugs in the throat, they were not in his larynx (adams apple ) etc. If they had he would be dead. After all ,when I was in DOD/DIA/DSE we were taught to crush the larynx, stab down through it for no noise or hammer it hard and have them drown in their own blood. The hits were probably on the side in a meaty portion and did not hit anything vital. Do you think he actually shrugged them off, or did it make him think about what he was going to do for the rest of the day? The .22 lr has dropped a lot of bad guys through out the years. I think you missed the point of which i made several. #1 A firearm is not always the right answer. #2 A hit with a .22 beats a miss with anything else every day of the week. #3 if the woman does not really want a firearm it is a really bad idea to push one on her. just MHO
You still missed the point. ANY caliber to the face is effective. You seem to be hurt by that.
Yes, people shot with a .45 multiple times have survived. All of that information has been well documented over the years.
 

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You still missed the point. ANY caliber to the face is effective. You seem to be hurt by that.
Yes, people shot with a .45 multiple times have survived. All of that information has been well documented over the years.
I did not miss the point. Many on here keep insisting that a larger caliber is need. Its always the people who have never been shot at or shot someone else, that have all the answers. The person in question has zero skills, no body strength and is not a gun person, only doing it because her husband is pushing it on her. That is a recipe for disaster trying to make them use a firarm when they really do not want too, and especially with a larger caliber.(IMHO) Firearms are not the answer to every problem,
 

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Be sure that I know a 38 special is better than a 22LR. What I was trying to say was a 22LR in the face is better than a a 38 special to the arm, and that the 22 is easier on weak hands. It also is less expensive so that lots of practice is affordable, and practice enough and you can hit a perp in the face.
I own a LCR9 and an LCR22. The trigger on the 22 is noticeably heavier. The rim fire needs a harder strike to light the round off. The OP states that the cocking to single action and trigger pull has more to do with his wife’s problem than recoil. Although his real problem may lie to certain extent in his wife’s mindset about firearms.
 
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