bug out/emergency fire can

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by buster40c, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

    8,549
    267
    83
    Here is a good source of fire for cooking or even a source of light that can be carried in a small bug out bag or sitting on top of the fridge. No need to try and find dry wood or trying to get a fire going to cook things. It can be used over and over and put back into the bug out bag for use another day. Perhaps your house has lost power and your stove or microwave will not work, or you might be rough camping or on a back packing trip.
    Take a used up can of tuna or some can of similar size. Cut cardboard box into strips as wide as the can is tall and long enough to wrap in a circle filling the inside of the can. Take an unscented candle and melt it onto the cardboard or melt the candle in a pan and pour the wax inside the can till the cardboard is covered just below the top of the can. Let it cool till the wax is again hardened and your fire can is finished.
    Whenever you need a fire for cooking, light source, or some heat to warm up with just lite the cardboard with a match or a lighter. Hold a pan with food over the fire or maybe use a stick to hold whatever over the fire. Just like roasting marshmallows.
    When you are done with the fire hold something over the can to smother the fire. After it cools and the wax is hardened again just put it in your bug out bag to use again. Believe me this will supply many a fire when needed, You can't get a cheaper yet functional carry around fire source.
    I have three made up in different size tuna cans. Yes it does work very well. Beware using food on a stick because you might get some wax from the smoke on you vittles.

    The can on the right was used once to heat up a pan of beans.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Aug 30, 2017
  2. spikedriver

    spikedriver Active Member

    992
    58
    28
    Buster, can you post a pic of this contraption? I think I've got the concept but I'd like to be sure. I'm not that great at visualizing.
     

  3. allenr

    allenr Member

    551
    11
    18
    Buster, never heard of the device you wrote about. Sounds very interesting, but I must be missing something. Fire requires fuel and fuel is consumable. When you light the cardboard doesn't' it burn into ash? And what does the wax do? It does not burn but would melt to some degree. Is the wax simply internded to keep the cardboard in place. I think it is a great ideal, but I am confused.
     
  4. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

    8,549
    267
    83
    The cardboard acts like a wick and just like a candle the wax does get burned off. One of these small cans would possibly provide several dozen fires for cooking with. It sure beats lugging around a propane tank and burner for fire.
    These are called buddy burners and some scouts have said they learned of making these while in the scouts. I believe we used to take a large metal coffee can and use a can opener to punch holes along the sides near the top. Put the coffee can over the lit buddy burner to set a pan on top for cooking.
     
  5. DoubleR

    DoubleR Active Member

    4,692
    1
    36
    We have made and used these over the years. Work VERY well.
    Also I take egg cartons and put lint from the drier in the egg sections, pour wax over the lint and let harden. Cut into chunks (one egg space each) and you have fire starters that last 8-10 minutes a piece. Use them to start fires when camping, keep them in our survival bags and use them often for our wood stove in the house. No matter how wet the wood these get the fire going very well.
     
  6. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

    8,549
    267
    83
    If you can post a picture of one of these. Sound like it might be good for starting charcoal briquettes.
     
  7. SavageGuy

    SavageGuy Active Member

    3,442
    15
    38
    Dryer lint is amazing. One spark from a flint and it lights up.
     
  8. DoubleR

    DoubleR Active Member

    4,692
    1
    36
    ImageUploadedByRuger Forum1504384292.100578.jpg
    ImageUploadedByRuger Forum1504384330.048805.jpg

    I save all old candles and scent waxes when they've lost their scent. Melt them in the oven and dump over the egg trays. Put down aluminum foil under the cartons. You can break up the spills and reuse on the next round.
    Yep! Hubby uses them for briquettes also.
     
  9. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

    8,549
    267
    83
    Darn I have been throwing away my lint. There is perfect example of waste not want not. Thanks for the pics
     
  10. DoubleR

    DoubleR Active Member

    4,692
    1
    36
    That's why I tried them years ago.
    We downgrade old egg cartons when they've outlived their use, save old wax and save all lint. Waste not for sure. :) Hope they work well for ya!
    A tip! I use a cheap bread (serrated) knife to cut them into blocks. Cuts right threw them. Put it with my supplies for making these and never wash it.
     
  11. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

    8,549
    267
    83
    I found this lint and toilet roll tube fire starter. In the summer I hardly ever use my dryer because I hang clothes on a line outside. So it will be a while till I can collect any lint.
    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=u06dQCUG29I[/ame]
     
  12. DoubleR

    DoubleR Active Member

    4,692
    1
    36
    I've seen those before also. I haven't tried them yet.
     
  13. buster40c

    buster40c Well-Known Member

    8,549
    267
    83
  14. spikedriver

    spikedriver Active Member

    992
    58
    28
    +1 on the dryer lint. Usually it will catch just from sparks. I've found that it won't burn very long if you don't shred or tear it up a little. The flame seems to burn only on the surface and not burn down through the lint.