Ruger Talk Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,419 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is one of 3 guns we bought off an old man at the gunshow on Saturday. He had been all over the show trying to trade the 3 guns for a new Glock in 40 cal. He didn't even know the model it was. Just had to be a .40. He would sell them if he could get enought to get a good Glock. He had looked at used and new ones. he had 2 guns priced at 3 bills each and one at a hundred.

The Ballester-Molina .45 (Ballerina Molester) was one of the 3 guns. I really wanted it cause I had one and had to sell it with other gun when I lost my job some years back. The guns were used by the "Ejercito ArgenIto" and so marked ont he right of the slide with the Argentine crest. Left side is marked in a long logo for the automobile factory that made these during WWII. Long named shortened to "HAFDASA." Also marked in metric 11.25 mm or .45 acp. Similar to the Colt 1911 which was also made there as the "Systema Colt." the Ballester-Moslina was simplifed. It had an upper slide section that was much the same as the 1911, takedown the same, G.I. sights, and a similar hammer. It will use any 1911 magazine which I have plenty of. The lower end of the gun is more like a STAR Model M in .45. It does not have the double bar trigger of the Systema Colt and no grip safety.

These were sold in several grades of original and well used, rearsenalized with a new barrel, and original like new. This one is all original and has @ 95% or more of it's finish. Little wear and tight. Shiney bore. Original grips.
Other gun I use to have was a rearsenalized. It was deadly accurate and I wish I still had it. This one is in better shape.

Scuttle butt on these guns is that they were made from the boiler plate and metal from the pocket battleship, "Graf Spee" which was sunk in an Argentine harbor during WWII. However it is not likely as the ship was not cut up till the end of the war. The "Systema Colt" and the Ballerina Molesters were made from fine steel shipped to Britain by the U.S. Britain then contracted for making weapons for WWII with Argentina and the U.S. steel was used. Every mil-surp collector should have one. Managed to talk teh old guy out of it for 2 bills. Worked for me.

Also did a pic of the gun and a quick test target at a realistic defensive distance of 10 feet. Only 5 rounds of Rem 230 gr. hardball. Looks like it is right at the POA. Muy buena pistola compadres!!!!



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Interesting, is the company still in business?

Just think if Browning was paid for every copy of his 1911 design, his fortune would be at least on par with Bill Gates.

I was unaware of the history and/or the gun, I will try to find one at the next gun show.

Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,419 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Interesting, is the company still in business?

Just think if Browning was paid for every copy of his 1911 design, his fortune would be at least on par with Bill Gates.

I was unaware of the history and/or the gun, I will try to find one at the next gun show.

Thanks
It would have been nice if had been the "Systema Colt" that was built in Argentina. However, those are much harder to locate. It is a true copy built on old Colt machinery.

But I can live with this one. The other one I had never failed.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top