10/22 Rifles and Clones

Discussion in 'Ruger 10/22' started by SGW Gunsmith, Mar 8, 2019.

  1. SGW Gunsmith

    SGW Gunsmith Active Member

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    I'd really like to see this 'forum' blossom, only because the Ruger 10/22 rifles are fun projects to easily modify and assemble into personal rifles having an owners wishes involved.
    I'm careful not to use words like "built" only because I was once told by a BATF-E compliance agent that came to my shop to do a records audit that when I was assembling 1911 pistols and by fitting slides and frames, that I purchased, and were actually "built" ( made ) by folks like Caspian Arms, Les Baer and a couple of others, that I was manufacturing and needed to acquire a "manufacturers license" which is extremely costly on a yearly basis.
    I know, it makes no sense considering someone else is actually MAKING the parts and we are doing some fitting and assembly.
    Anyway, since I don't need to have any 'black helos' and dudes wearing balaclavas swooping down on my empire...........I'm gonna be doing "personal touches" and some very slight modifying on Ruger 10/22's. :)

    One thing I've noticed when dabbling with these fine rifles happens when installing the 0.920 diameter bull barrels 18 to 20 inches in length. Some engineer at Ruger back in 1964 felt that the receiver only needs to have one action screw to hold the receiver down and into place. Well, thanks to some of the most innovative folks in this great country of ours, it was discovered that a much better quality, and heavier barrel, will get these rifles shooting groups not realised previously. It was also discovered that the heavier barrels shot best when free-floated.
    Now, here's where that single action screw does not always do its job very well, and 'barrel droop' can occur. The barrel doesn't actually droop, but, because of its heavier weight, it will tilt forward until it engages with the barrel channel. Not the best for accuracy.
    I know, some folks will bed the complete barrel into the forearm and let the receiver float. Sometimes that will work, other times, not so much. Here's what I like to do:
    [​IMG]
    I set up the receiver in a fixture I made to hold the receiver in my mill to add a tang onto the very back face of the receiver:
    [​IMG]
    The tang is then inletted into the stock and then the receiver tang is bedded in place using Devcon liquid steel:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Now, I feel assured that the receiver has absolute contact with the stock and the barrel will remain floated and not eventually droop down and into the barrel channel.
    Is this an extreme measure? Well, it depends on where you personally want to go with your 10/22 Ruger. It's just another means that helps these rifles shoot better and more accurately. And, there are several other means that an owner can do themselves IF they choose to do so. Groups did actually improve on this version.
     
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  2. MDS

    MDS New Member

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    Great job on that fixture, and the milling. I'd be curious to hear if you had any interesting experiences while putting that together.
    I have a KIDD receiver that comes milled for a tang just like that. The one problem I've had is mounting a C-More to that proprietary scope base of theirs, so I've begun designing my own adapter. I can't wait to start machining some prototypes.
     
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  3. SGW Gunsmith

    SGW Gunsmith Active Member

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    Thanks. Do you mean putting the fixture together? I feel your enthusiasm for making a base of your design. All of my machinery is manual, but if someone has the programming skills and availability of use for CNC machining, a base can more easily be made for the 10/22 to match the radius on the top of the receiver.
    I do have some 10/22 bases in stock with MOA built in for 100 to 200 yard shooting so scope adjustment doesn't run out for elevation.
    Would like to see your ideas of an adapter, as you are probably on to something others might be interested in.

    Dennis
     
  4. SGW Gunsmith

    SGW Gunsmith Active Member

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    I made a hole location fixture to drill base mounting holes for those Ruger Mark pistols that have not been drilled and tapped from the factory. This fixture emulates, exactly what the hole location and spacing is for those Mark pistols that they now send already drilled and tapped:
    [​IMG]
    I make the bases also, but not like the factory provided bases that hang off the end of the receiver by an inch or so. With this base, the optic can be removed and the sights are in plain view. Return the optic to the base and zero has been held.
     
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  5. MDS

    MDS New Member

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    That's awesome! You did that all on manual machines too?
     
  6. SGW Gunsmith

    SGW Gunsmith Active Member

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    Yes, that's all I have, and use, is manually operated machines:

    [​IMG]
     
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