Ruger Talk Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to the forum and the 10/22 , bought a like new but used 10/22 , Trigger was terrible so i replaced it with the BX series , so much better but still seems to have a lot of jams and stovepipes with several different brands of ammo . any ideas as what to do next.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,442 Posts
First off, welcome to RugerTalk. :welcome:

Did you shoot it before the trigger swap?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Shooter

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,549 Posts
Does it happen with other magazines as well? Magazines can cause some real headaches. Take some time on the introduction thread for new members. It usually gets new members off to a better rolling start here at RT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Step 1. Scrub the heck out of the chamber, and remove any built up bullet lube and carbon.
Many shooters drill a hole in the rear of the receiver so the rifle can be cleaned from the chamber.
Some brands of .22 ammo are nasty and over lubed with bullet wax/lube and can gum up the chamber.
A true stove pipe is caused by a dirty firearm and the bolt not moving freely to the rear. So clean the rifle and check the extractor and extractor cut out in the barrel for gunk and clean.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11 Posts
Replace the extractor. Most times stove piping is caused by a worn or faulty extractor not holding onto the shell case rim long enough to be hit by the ejector.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
all the above suggestions are excellent advice. A couple more things to do to help the issue. First get some scotchbrite and scrub the inside of the receiver to eliminate the roughness caused by the painting or the casting process. No Dremel !!! Secondly radius the rear of the bolt (or purchase a quality aftermarket bolt) so the bolt glides smoothly over the action. These things should help a bunch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
For me the 10/22 has been a reliable platform. I have experienced few issues, all related to dirty or worn plastic lipped magazines, or a very dirty firearm. I have no doubt all those aftermarket parts changes are beneficial, but I haven't found them necessary as long as I perform proper care of the firearm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
I've had my 10/22 for several years and no problems yet. Good advice above. Be sure to check each of them one at a time and do a test fire after each. Hope it works out for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
The original rotary mags are the most reliable. Never had an issue with mine. Even some full conversions go bang every time, but they still get dirty.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Be sure and try a brand new factory Ruger magazine.
I've had mine since 1973, and after a few years of use they just wear out. Actually they also get grungy...Every one I've taken apart, cleaned and put back together never gave 100 % reliability. I think the springs get unsprung or weak, I have 5 or 6 that are no longer 100%...just retire them . A brand new one is cheap.
The most trouble I've had is with aftermarket 25 and 50 round ...they just nowhere near factory 10 round reliable .
Before spending a bunch of money...try the new magazine and a good cleaning and lubricating.
Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
It sounds to me like a dirty receiver and if it is very dirty it wouldn't hurt to clean the bolt assembly. If you aren't mechanically adept at bolt disassembly, I would contact a reputable gunsmith.

My brother has a Marlin Model 60 and he brought it to me once saying the bolt return spring was broken because it returned to battery very slowly. I am a trained gunsmith. I told him it was dirty, which offended him a little. So I disassembled it to include the bolt assembly, cleaned it and re-assembled it. It now works like new, many people don't realize the gun needs to be broken completely down for a thorough cleaning once in awhile.
If you're not sure of your abilities, please get a good gunsmith to do the job, it's worth the money.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
405 Posts
When the Ruger 10/22 starts to produce "stove-pipe" spent shells, I'll replace the factory extractor with a much better variation. there's a good reason that there are 6 different aftermarket extractors for these rifles.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top