Articles from Editor

  1. The classic Ruger Model 44 Carbine: A 10/22 times two!

    Now out of production for going on thirty years, the Model 44 carbine, named easily enough because of its chambering in the beastly .44-magnum caliber, was a vintage rifle from another time that we wish Ruger would revisit. (Photo by AR15.com) Background In 1964, Bill Ruger came out with his instant classic 10/22 rifle. Now in its 50th year of solid and continuous production, that innovative .22LR rimfire carbine actually was a rehash of a gun that had come out three years before, the...
  2. Ruger Model 96: Let your Lever gun roll

    Sure, the Model 10/22 is one of the best rimfire shooters in the world, and everyone loves its fast handling semi-automatic action, but there is just something interesting about a modern lever-action rifle. With that being said, Sturm Ruger nearly twenty years ago begat the Model 96. Why? Lever action or cowboy action carbines and rifles debuted in the mid-19th Century. A favorite of homesteaders, cavalrymen, and those law enforcement of the day, these guns were the fastest firing long...
  3. Ruger Seeing Blue and Red: New custom pistol offerings

    At last month's SHOT show the fine folks over at Sturm, Ruger, as always, came correct with a number of new guns in the lineup. This year's entries include a pair that are new and very colorful takes on classic handguns. What we know The annual Shooting, Hunting, Outdoor Trade Show-better known as the SHOT Show, put on by the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) is the showplace that gun makers from around the world come to every year to introduce new products. Typically, the global...
  4. My 15.9 ounce Ruger LCP pocket carry kit

    Depending on what I wear and what's on the agenda for any given day dictates how and what I carry for a self-defense gun. On the occasion that calls for it, my pocket carry set up gives me 15-shots of dependable protection that comes in at (just) under a pound. The gun Back in 2011, I picked up my LCP brand new for $279 plus tax out the door and, realizing the known issue of surface rust on these guns in my part of the country when carried close to sweaty bodies, I had it professionally...
  5. Feds going after M855 Greentip 5.56mm ammo

    If you are a Mini-14 or SR-556 owner, odds are you are constantly on the lookout for good deals on ammo and one of the best in recent years has been various versions of the military standard 'green tip' 5.56mm. Well, it looks like the Obama administration is pulling at a few threads here to try to do away with this common load and now is your chance to do something about it. What is Green Tip anyway? When Eugene Stoner came out with his AR-15 rifle in the 1960s, it was a civilian sporting...
  6. Ruger goes hybrid with their new Hawkeye FTW Predator

    Strum, Ruger last month debuted a couple new rifles in their popular Hawkeye Predator line of lightweight varmint rifles with unique stylings. These two, however, are only part Hawkeye, it seems that their family tree is mixed with the best parts of the Scout series as well. The new FTW Predator According to a release from Ruger, "The Hawkeye FTW Predator rifle design began with extensive on-range consultation with SAAM (Sportsman's All-weather, All-terrain Marksmanship) shooting...
  7. Government issue Ruger plinkers

    Between 1956 and 1986, the U.S. military ordered some 23,000 rimfire semi-auto Mark I and Mark II pistols direct from the company for the use of service marksmanship teams. There is a lot of misinformation out there on these but here is what we know about these collectables. The Mark I Bill Ruger produced his Ruger Standard pistol in 1949, taking lessons from the Japanese Nambu and the Hi Standard .22. His neat little $37 pistol with its 9-shot magazine and 4.75-inch barrel turned out to...
  8. Mini 30: The all-around, goto Ruger carbine

    Over a decade after Ruger brought out their classic Mini-14 rifle in .223, the company decided to update the design to a completely new hybrid chambered in a very Russian caliber. The rest, as they say... (Current 'New' model Mini-30 note the PC-9 style rear sights) Why was it invented? Taking a trip back to the mid-1980s, the Reagan-era had a lot of neat things about it. Besides allowing private ownership of new full-auto firearms, the feds also had very relaxed import regulations with...
  9. Ruger's rifle that never was-- the hard hitting XGI

    With a decade of fast Mini-14 sales behind them, Ruger decided to up-gun that .223 rifle to a much more impressive .308 caliber around 1984. The result was the XGI rifle and they are about as rare as it gets. Why the XGI? In the mid-1980s, Ruger was planning a reinvention of the company to include police and military products. They marketed the AC556, the GB-series Mini, and introduced the P-85 pistol all aimed at law enforcement sales. Many police departments were adopting the '14 for...
  10. Ruger's budget falling block: The No. 3 rifle

    Made for just a baker's dozen of years across the 1970s and 80s, the Ruger No.3 is a little-known but often loved single shot rifle made in a host of interesting calibers-- if you can find one. No. 1 origins In 1967, Bill Ruger was steadily expanding his growing company into a number of different ventures. One of these, he decided, would be a single-shot rifle based on a classic design that harkened to the old 'great white hunters' of yesteryear. Rugged sportsmen like Frank Selous and WDM...
  11. The Super Silent Super Secret Ruger Redhawk Rifle

    Back in the early 1990s C. Reed Knight Jr.'s Knight's Armament Co (KAC) of Vero Beach, Florida responded to a shadowy call from a government agency as yet unnamed to produce a small and short ranged but devastating suppressed rifle. Their answer was a unique weapon based upon a Ruger Super Red Hawk. What was it? The story goes that KAC built the gun on spec to provide a weapon capable of making effective anti-personnel shots at ranges of up to 100-yards, while being capable of a rapid...
  12. Ruger reaches back in the vault for the new and improved .327 wheelgun

    America's favorite gun maker is reaching back into the creative closet and bringing forth a blast from the past that has some six-shooter aficionados rejoicing. Yes, we are talking about the return of the SP-101 in .327 Fed Mag. Why 327? Introduced through a partnership by Sturm, Ruger and Federal Cartridge in 2007, the .327 Federal Magnum uses the rimmed, straight-walled .32 H&R case with a very lightweight .312 caliber bullet (typically 100 grains) to generate a screamer of a round that...
  13. A look at the Ruger LC9: Tomorrow's slimline 9 of four years ago

    Introduced in 2011 on the heels of the outrageously successful .380ACP caliber Ruger LCP (Lightweight Compact Pistol), the LC9 gave the masses of concealed carry devotees who loved the size of that pocket gun but not the caliber something more substantial to wrap their hands around. Why the LC9 Going back to the 1900s, the small Colt vest (hey guys wore them back then) and pocket sized semi-auto handguns were all snappy little blowback actions chambered in .25, .32, or .380 (all of which...
  14. The short-lived Ruger Gold Label SXS

    Just after the turn of the century, Sturm, Ruger made an effort to produce a light side-by-side 12-gauge shotgun that could compete with what was coming out of Belgium, Spain, and Japan. This double-barreled beauty, dubbed the Gold Label, was a brief but now beloved classic. Red Label predecessors Back in the 1970s, Bill Ruger introduced a honey of an American-made over and under (O/U) shotgun by drawing inspiration from Browning's Superimposed and Winchester Model 21 (which had moved to...
  15. A factory Ruger Mini-14 in .300 Blackout? No foolin

    The good folks at Ruger have been in the Mini-14 biz for going some 40 years or so and in that time have cranked out millions of these rugged .223 carbines. As time has gone by, the company has trotted out offerings of these guns in 5.56x45 (there is a slight difference over .223), .222 (not a misprint) 7.62x39 (Mini-30) 6.8mm (Mini-6.8) and .308/.243 (XGI). Well now, the time has come to add a new caliber to that field: Why .300 BLK The 300 AAC Blackout round (7.62x35mm) was designed by a...
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