The Appleseed Thread

Discussion in 'Ruger 10/22' started by Thunder71, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. Thunder71

    Thunder71 New Member

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    I'm currently getting 2 Ruger 10/22's ready for my first Appleseed event and figured there must be a few members here who have done one or may be interested in doing one. I have read through the Appleseed site to get as much info as possible there, guess I'm just looking for more.

    So far I've taken bone stock Ruger 10/22 Carbine's and added Tech-Sights, 1 1/4" sling mounts, and a USGI sling - that's what seems to be the highest and most unarguable modifications I've found.

    I've read about bolt buffers, but think they are more for your own benefit than the gun itself and I don't mind the sound my 10/22's make, so I think I'll leave it at that.

    Automatic bolt release modification I don't think I'm interested in either because I've read that although they make it easier to chamber the first round, it takes more effort to get the bolt to lock back.

    I'd like to leave as much factory as possible, I guess I'm one of the few that actually likes how they are as-is, but if you feel there is something that is very beneficial to the Ruger 10/22 please chime in, my mind isn't made up.
     
  2. Douglas

    Douglas New Member

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    I've been instructing at Appleseed Projects for about three years now. I build Appleseed ready LTRs for sale out of the box.

    Sounds like you have it about ready. All I would add is a good trigger job and fit the extractor to the bolt to prevent stove pipes. Also check the firing pin protrusion. It should be between 0.025" to 0.035".

    A note on the bolt hold open. During your "Prep Period" you can let the bolt go forward so that when you are given the load command you don't have to screw with the release. No firing time should be lost due to this.
     

  3. Thunder71

    Thunder71 New Member

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    Thank you for your input, that helps and it sounds like you have a lot of experience with these.

    That brings up another thing that I've been wondering.

    Is it best to go through the training and get good with the rifle prior to doing any trigger modifications? In my mind, getting good with a stock trigger is beneficial as a light trigger could hide imperfections in shooting style, but I could be way off on that.

    Thoughts?